1917

1917

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1917

Two young British soldiers attempt to deliver a message that could save 1,600 men in this continuous-shot WWI drama from Sam Mendes (Skyfall). Winner of Best Director and Best Film at the 2020 BAFTAs and Golden Globes.

At the height of WWI, two young British soldiers, Schofield (George MacKay, Captain Fantastic) and Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman, Game of Thrones) must cross enemy territory in a race against time to deliver a message that will stop a deadly attack on hundreds of soldiers - Blake's own brother among them.

Best Cinematography, Visual Effects & Sound Mixing, Academy Awards 2020; Best Director & Motion Picture (Drama), Golden Globes 2020; Best Film, Director, Visual Effects, Cinematography, Production Design, Sound and Outstanding British Film, BAFTAs 2020
2020Rating: R13, Depicts graphic & realistic war scenes119 minsUSA, UK
DramaWar
86%
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Reviews & comments

Flicks

Flicks, Daniel Rutledge

flicks

1917 works fantastically as a pulse-pounding thriller set against the backdrop of the end of WWI. Technically, it’s absolutely extraordinary, but it says very little about the war itself, or war in general, or much at all, which is a missed opportunity.

4.0
1

Well shot movie

1917 is a technically well-shot movie and will keep everyone entertained on the storyline for the time in the theatre.

4.0
0

Immersive and beautifully shot

5.0
0

The Film to End all Films.

Every so often a film is released that leaves the audience in breathtaking awe. Hundreds of eyes are captivated by the enthralling moments played out on the big silver screen and for a short while the mind actually believes it is there at that particular point in time. It is the way cinema was intended to be received but very few films hook the paying...

5.0
0

Whilst technically brilliant and extraordinary, the story of 1917 sacrifices some potentially intriguing character and plot development for action and cinematic sequences that resemble gaming cut scenes and, at times, the atmosphere of a theatre play. Why? Quite enjoyed all of the acting cameos but none more than Andrew Scott's sardonic Lieutenant Leslie

4.0
0
New Zealand Listener

New Zealand Listener

press

Inspired by a tale of war his grandad had told him, Mendes co-wrote the story with rising-star screenwriter Krysty Wilson-Cairns, a 31-year-old Scot with a deep interest in military history who has been touring European battlefields from a young age. Together, the pair have nailed that imperative for engaging war storytelling: an intimate story told within a grand and horrific context.

4.0
0
FilmInk

FilmInk

press

A triumph of style, and a beautiful looking film, it’s just a pity it didn’t have more to say.

0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

The experience of watching 1917 is enveloping, overwhelming, confronting. I've just spent two years studying the Western Front for a book, and this recreation is hard to fault – from the ramshackle British trenches to the precision-engineered German earthworks and deep dugouts that made them so immovable.

1
Stuff

Stuff

press

A war film that will take you on both a physical and emotional journey, 1917 is likely to be remembered as one of the great movies of 2020.

0
Variety

Variety

press

Astonishing as his filmmaking can be at times, it's Mendes' attention to character, more than the technique, that makes "1917" one of 2019's most impressive cinematic achievements.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

This is a protean display of virtuoso filmmaking, one that film aesthetes will wallow in but that even ordinary audiences will note and appreciate.

1
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

An amazingly audacious film; as exciting as a heist movie, disturbing as a sci-fi nightmare.

5.0
0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

It may be a grandiose flourish, but you can't deny it makes for a startlingly literal theater of war.

0
South China Morning Post

South China Morning Post

press

A visceral World War I movie that is both technically masterful and emotionally devastating. It's easily the best film of Mendes' career.

5.0
0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Although 1917's filmmaking very much brings attention to itself, it's an astonishing piece of filmmaking, portraying war with enormous panache. This is big-screen bravado, and then some.

4.0
4
Total Film

Total Film

press

It's a staggering technical achievement, one that will see Roger Deakins retaining his unofficial Greatest Living Cinematographer crown.

4.0
0
Flicks

Flicks, Daniel Rutledge

flicks

1917 works fantastically as a pulse-pounding thriller set against the backdrop of the end of WWI. Technically, it’s absolutely extraordinary, but it says very little about the war itself, or war in general, or much at all, which is a missed opportunity.

4.0
1
New Zealand Listener

New Zealand Listener

press

Inspired by a tale of war his grandad had told him, Mendes co-wrote the story with rising-star screenwriter Krysty Wilson-Cairns, a 31-year-old Scot with a deep interest in military history who has been touring European battlefields from a young age. Together, the pair have nailed that imperative for engaging war storytelling: an intimate story told within a grand and horrific context.

4.0
0
FilmInk

FilmInk

press

A triumph of style, and a beautiful looking film, it’s just a pity it didn’t have more to say.

0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

The experience of watching 1917 is enveloping, overwhelming, confronting. I've just spent two years studying the Western Front for a book, and this recreation is hard to fault – from the ramshackle British trenches to the precision-engineered German earthworks and deep dugouts that made them so immovable.

1
Stuff

Stuff

press

A war film that will take you on both a physical and emotional journey, 1917 is likely to be remembered as one of the great movies of 2020.

0
Variety

Variety

press

Astonishing as his filmmaking can be at times, it's Mendes' attention to character, more than the technique, that makes "1917" one of 2019's most impressive cinematic achievements.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

This is a protean display of virtuoso filmmaking, one that film aesthetes will wallow in but that even ordinary audiences will note and appreciate.

1
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

An amazingly audacious film; as exciting as a heist movie, disturbing as a sci-fi nightmare.

5.0
0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

It may be a grandiose flourish, but you can't deny it makes for a startlingly literal theater of war.

0
South China Morning Post

South China Morning Post

press

A visceral World War I movie that is both technically masterful and emotionally devastating. It's easily the best film of Mendes' career.

5.0
0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Although 1917's filmmaking very much brings attention to itself, it's an astonishing piece of filmmaking, portraying war with enormous panache. This is big-screen bravado, and then some.

4.0
4
Total Film

Total Film

press

It's a staggering technical achievement, one that will see Roger Deakins retaining his unofficial Greatest Living Cinematographer crown.

4.0
0

Well shot movie

1917 is a technically well-shot movie and will keep everyone entertained on the storyline for the time in the theatre.

4.0
0

Immersive and beautifully shot

5.0
0

The Film to End all Films.

Every so often a film is released that leaves the audience in breathtaking awe. Hundreds of eyes are captivated by the enthralling moments played out on the big silver screen and for a short while the mind actually believes it is there at that particular point in time. It is the way cinema was intended to be received but very few films hook the paying...

5.0
0

Whilst technically brilliant and extraordinary, the story of 1917 sacrifices some potentially intriguing character and plot development for action and cinematic sequences that resemble gaming cut scenes and, at times, the atmosphere of a theatre play. Why? Quite enjoyed all of the acting cameos but none more than Andrew Scott's sardonic Lieutenant Leslie

4.0
0