Black Box (2020)

Black Box (2020)

Black Box (2020)

Part of the Blumhouse series of horror films for Prime Video. A single father struggling to remember the car accident that claimed his wife takes on a risky and experimental treatment.

2020100 minsUSAPrime Video
HorrorScience Fiction

Streaming (1 Providers)

Black Box (2020) / Reviews

Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

While it never descends into the nightmare its premise threatens, Black Box is a solid thriller that benefits from strong performances and a screenplay packed with philosophical anguish.

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Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine

The film ruminates on how virtuality infiltrates the deepest regions of our subconscious to reprogram the inner workings of the self.

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IndieWire

IndieWire

Black Box won’t galvanize audiences like “Get Out” into rethinking the way society interacts with itself. But it’s just shrewd enough to question how we interact with ourselves.

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RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

Black Box is a little wobbly in balancing its science-fiction logic and some wholesale horror thrills, but to the credit of debut director Osei-Kuffour Jr., both genre elements have their place.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

It also brings some devilish ingenuity to its variations on “Memento” and other “who am I?” thrillers. And it adds to that something more rare: a genuine emotional potency.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

The confident storytelling keeps you watching, as well as strong performances from Mamoudou Athie as a widowed amnesiac and Phylicia Rashad as a brilliant brain specialist playing God.

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Slash Film

Slash Film

The creepy memories brought on by tampering with science angle is nifty in a 1950s sci-fi throwback sort of way, but while Osei-Kuffour Jr. is able to conjure up more than a few disturbing moments Black Box loses steam rather quickly.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

Makes you wonder if Blumhouse is using its TV arm as a dumping ground for concepts that don’t quite make the cinematic cut.

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