Holding the Man

Holding the Man

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Holding the Man

Australian romantic drama following John, the football jock, and Tim, the actor with aspirations. Their high-school romance carries across 15 years – through discrimination, temptation and jealousy. Co-stars Guy Pearce, Anthony LaPaglia (Balibo) and Sarah Snook (Predestination).

"Published in 1995, Holding the Man - winner of the United Nations Human Rights Award for Non-Fiction - is one of Australia's favourite books. A tender, celebratory and refreshingly honest memoir about the author's long-term love for John Caleo, his Melbourne high school's football captain...  Directed by Neil Armfield (Candy)... Adapted for the screen by Tommy Murphy, whose stage version wowed audiences from Sydney to London, it is every bit as moving, witty and inspirational as its source material." (Melbourne International Film Festival)

2015Rating: R16, Violence,offensive language and sex scenes128 minsAustralia
DramaRomanceFestival & Independent
96%
want to see

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Reviews & comments

Urban Cinefile

Urban Cinefile

press

The two central performances are superb, Corr and Stott encapsulating the emotional journey to perfection.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Memorable performances but a little wobbly.

2.0
0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

Matches humour with devastation.

3.0
0
Stuff

Stuff

press

Feels like a cross between French Canadian family drama C.R.A.Z.Y. and Philadelphia, but with its own distinctive Aussie flavour.

4.0
0
Screen Daily

Screen Daily

press

Owes much to the stage rather than the page, as the majority of its interactions and exchanges make clear.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

A spry, delicately handled tearjerker.

0

Based on the 1995 memoir by revered gay rights activist Timothy Conigrave, the film version struggles to avoid soapy melodrama and corny humour.

It is ten years since the release of Brokeback Mountain (2005), now widely acknowledged as a landmark film for the LGBT movement’s long struggle to be represented on the big screen. It was one of many cinematic high-points on the wave of such films that started twenty years earlier. The film industry has changed since then; the genre of ‘queer cinema’ is...

3.0
0

Poignant, honest, heartbreaking and incredibly romantic.

0
Urban Cinefile

Urban Cinefile

press

The two central performances are superb, Corr and Stott encapsulating the emotional journey to perfection.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Memorable performances but a little wobbly.

2.0
0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

Matches humour with devastation.

3.0
0
Stuff

Stuff

press

Feels like a cross between French Canadian family drama C.R.A.Z.Y. and Philadelphia, but with its own distinctive Aussie flavour.

4.0
0
Screen Daily

Screen Daily

press

Owes much to the stage rather than the page, as the majority of its interactions and exchanges make clear.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

A spry, delicately handled tearjerker.

0

Based on the 1995 memoir by revered gay rights activist Timothy Conigrave, the film version struggles to avoid soapy melodrama and corny humour.

It is ten years since the release of Brokeback Mountain (2005), now widely acknowledged as a landmark film for the LGBT movement’s long struggle to be represented on the big screen. It was one of many cinematic high-points on the wave of such films that started twenty years earlier. The film industry has changed since then; the genre of ‘queer cinema’ is...

3.0
0

Poignant, honest, heartbreaking and incredibly romantic.

0