Rūrangi

Rūrangi

Rūrangi

When a tragedy shakes the confidence of a young trans activist (Elz‌ ‌Carrad), he returns to the hometown he fled years ago to rediscover himself in this Aotearoa dramatic feature from director Max Currie (Everything We Loved) and writer Cole Meyers.

"A‌ ‌young‌ ‌trans‌ ‌activist, ‌‌Caz‌ ‌(‌Carrad),‌ ‌breaks‌ ‌down‌ ‌into‌ ‌tears‌ ‌in‌ ‌front‌ ‌of‌ ‌a‌ ‌support‌ ‌group‌ ‌towards‌ ‌the‌ ‌start‌ ‌of‌ ‌‌Rūrangi‌.‌ ‌He‌ ‌doesn’t‌ ‌know‌ ‌how‌ ‌he‌ ‌can‌ ‌help‌ ‌the‌ ‌queer‌ ‌people‌ ‌in‌ ‌front‌ ‌of‌ ‌him,‌ ‌and‌ ‌feels‌ ‌entirely‌ ‌guilty,‌ ‌even‌ ‌shameful‌ ‌about‌ ‌that‌ ‌fact.‌ ‌Like‌ ‌many‌ ‌of‌ ‌our‌ ‌young‌ ‌queer‌ ‌people,‌ ‌he’s‌ ‌burned‌ ‌out‌ ‌not‌ ‌by‌ ‌his‌ ‌struggle,‌ ‌but‌ ‌by‌ ‌the‌ ‌struggle‌ ‌of‌ ‌those‌ ‌around‌ ‌him.‌ ‌Having fled his hometown of Rūrangi‌ to find himself, Caz returns ‌hoping‌ ‌to‌ ‌connect‌ ‌not‌‌ ‌just with‌ ‌his‌ ‌father‌ ‌(Kirk‌ ‌Torrance),‌ ‌who‌ ‌he‌ ‌left‌ ‌ten‌ ‌years‌ ‌ago,‌ ‌pre-transition,‌ but‌ ‌the‌ ‌small‌ ‌community‌ whose ‌residents are ‌having‌ ‌struggles of their own‌ ‌now‌ ‌as‌ ‌well." (New Zealand International Film Festival)

Originally debuting at NZIFF as a web-series, this new theatrical release has been substantially re-edited into a continuous feature film.

2020Rating: M, Offensive language & suicide references87 minsNew Zealand
Drama

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Rūrangi / Reviews

Flicks

Flicks, Amelia Berry

Even with its shining gender diverse credentials, it’s frankly shocking that Rūrangi has managed to make a film about transgender experiences that has this much clarity, lightness, accessibility, truth, and joy. Even the darkest moments of this film feel like a triumph because of the deftness and fresh approach with which they’re handled. For a trans audience, seeing Rūrangi will feel like coming home for the first time.

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Stuff

Stuff

A Kiwi film to celebrate and enjoy - and one that might just save lives.

Full review
Keeping Up With NZ

Keeping Up With NZ

Elz Carrad is incredibly impressive in his screen debut, giving a subtle and captivating performance. Kirk Torrance, as his father Gerald, and Arlo Green as Jem also shine alongside Carrad who so effortlessly carries this deeply personal story to us.

Full review