The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

The first part of Peter Jackon's New Zealand-made fantasy trilogy begins in the bucolic bliss of The Shire, where a short, furry-footed folk called Hobbits dwell. When Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) comes into the possession of an evil magical ring, he is forced to leave home under the advice of a wise old wizard, Gandalf (Ian McKellen). Frodo and three of his kinsfolk are advised by the Elves that the ring must destroyed in the fires of Mt Doom, deep in the dark land of Mordor. So a fellowship sets out on the quest, comprising of four hobbits, two humans, an elf, a dwarf and a wizard.

Best Cinematography, Visual Effects, Makeup and Score at the Academy Awards 2002. Best Film, BAFTA Awards 2002.
2001Rating: PG, Battle violence & fantasy horror178 minsNew Zealand, USA
AdventureFantasyBlockbuster
73%
want to see

Streaming (6 Providers)

Reviews & comments

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

press

Peter Jackson, the New Zealand director who masterminded this film (and two more to follow, in a $300 million undertaking), has made a work for, and of, our times. It will be embraced, I suspect, by many Tolkien fans and take on aspects of a cult.

Variety

Variety

press

The sheer scope and star quotient of the film, accompanied by positive reviews, could place the film as a dark horse contender in several categories.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

Jackson deserves to revel in his success. He’s made a three-hour film that leaves you wanting more.

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

press

Peter Jackson, the New Zealand director who masterminded this film (and two more to follow, in a $300 million undertaking), has made a work for, and of, our times. It will be embraced, I suspect, by many Tolkien fans and take on aspects of a cult.

Variety

Variety

press

The sheer scope and star quotient of the film, accompanied by positive reviews, could place the film as a dark horse contender in several categories.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

Jackson deserves to revel in his success. He’s made a three-hour film that leaves you wanting more.