Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula

Yeon Sang-ho returns to direct the sequel to Korean zombie apocalypse thriller Train to Busan. Set four years after the events of the first film, the characters must fight to escape from their now decimated home.

2020Rating: R13, Violence, horror & cruelty115 minsSouth KoreaKorean with English subtitles
ActionHorrorWorld Cinema
Director:
Yeon Sang-ho ('Train to Busan', 'The Fake', 'The King of Pigs')
Writer:
Yeon Sang-hoRyu Yong-jae
Cast:
Kang Dong-wonLee Jung-hyunLee ReKwon Hae-hyo

Streaming (3 Providers)

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula | Reviews

54%125 reviews

Rotten Tomatoes® Score

All reviews on Rotten Tomatoes
Flicks

Flicks, Steve Newall

Apart from a few chilling moments—a reveal of hundreds of zombies pressed up against glass just in front of its heroes, for instance—Peninsula squanders the potential that lies in the return to a world lost to the undead. As opposed to a constant existential threat, the zombies’ presence is mainly used to increase the film’s tempo arbitrarily—as CGI creatures to splatter en masse with CGI cars or a chaotic addition to human versus human gunfights. Gone are paranoid tropes (Is this person bitten? Is this room safe?) in favour of fairly unspectacular action, returning writer-director Yeon Sang-ho seeming more interested in Incheon’s soldiers-gone-mad survivors (who frankly are not depicted as all that interesting).

Full review
Variety

Variety

The film has clipped along at a reasonably brisk pace until this point, only to downshift into a laughably protracted slow-motion finale, full of gratuitous lens flares and overwrought strings.

Full review
IndieWire

IndieWire

Yeon eventually just throws his hands up and surrenders to the cheesy spectacle of it all with a frenzied third act that finds the entire cast in a death race to the border. It’s here that Yeon stops being able to afford his own ambition, and the film’s budget suddenly feels like a rubber band stretched over a hula-hoop.

Full review
Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine

Peninsula feels like the work of an artist who misunderstood his past triumph, squandering his talent for the sake of a pandering, halfhearted encore.

Full review
A.V. Club

A.V. Club

While the first Train To Busan was an affecting, character-driven tale of grief and redemption, Peninsula flounders in generic spectacle. Even fans may wonder if there are any bones left to pick on this franchise.

Full review
Stuff

Stuff

Peninsula is a sturdy, but almost heroically derivative cash-in on a still-brilliant original. If you like the genre as much as I do, you'll be happy enough with how it's turned out.

Full review

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula | Trailers