The Social Network

The Social Network

(2010)

Drama about the founders of Facebook, directed by David Fincher (Zodiac, Fight Club) and starring Jesse Eisenberg (The Squid and the Whale) as Mark Zuckerberg. Based on the book The Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich.... More

Nowadays, Facebook has over 500 million members, is valued at $US 16 billion and has changed the way people interact worldwide. Here the story focuses on the company's origins – in Harvard college dorm rooms – and how overnight success and wealth impacted on Facebook's founders.

Justin Timberlake plays Sean Parker, the Napster co-founder who became Facebook's founding president; and Andrew Garfield plays Eduardo Saverin, the Facebook co-founder who fell out with Zuckerberg.Hide

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Flicks Review

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s gone on record to label David Fincher’s scintillating tell-all of his company’s tumultuous inception as “fiction”, but questionable journalistic integrity is a small price to pay when you’re watching something as riveting and skillfully constructed as The Social Network.... More

In their adaptation of Ben Mezrich’s novel The Accidental Millionaires, Fincher and writer Aaron Sorkin (The West Wing) grip the viewer from the very first frame and proceed to translate what potentially is really dry material for cinema into a deft distillation of universal thematic hooks that form the core of many great stories: more so than the creation of a cultural phenomenon, The Social Network is the classic rags-to-riches tale, the ultimate revenge of the nerd and the heartbreaking autopsy of a broken friendship.

Played by Jesse Eisenberg, who pulls out a positively sociopathic performance that puts any reservations of his indie-geek “other Michael Cera” sensibilities at rest, Zuckerberg isn’t presented in the most flattering light, but the most human: unfalteringly brilliant but emotionally clueless. As jilted business partner Eduardo Saverin, Andrew Garfield touchingly embodies the personal collateral damage of Zuckerberg’s steamrolling.

With the exception of a canoe race montage which employs flashy “tilt-shift” photography to jarring effect, Fincher is all restrained visual rigour here, while Sorkin’s relentless, lighting-paced dialogue – matched with the nimble, non-linear editing – mirrors the speedy viral nature in which information is shared and processed in our age. An invigorating and vital film.Hide


The Peoples' Reviews

Average ratings from 17 ratings, 18 reviews
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BY clararar superstar

It really was a shame this got (possibly unfairly) eclipsed by The King's Speech during awards season, but regardless of whether you love or hate or even use Facebook, or believe how close this was to true events, it's a brilliantly written and acted film that anyone can enjoy. I loved how I actually had to use my brain to keep up with all the dialogue, instead of letting it switch off as in most movies. Highly recommended.


BY Gerd superstar

Booooooooooooooooooooring!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Eisenberg took the step up to A-List actor in this film. He is simply brillant and if not for Firth's performance in The King's Speech may well see himself as the frontrunner for the Oscar in any other year.

Fincher and Sorkin have their fingerprints all over this film. The script is one of a kind. It's clever, it's fast and it's just really really great.

The musical score is mesmerising also, the haunting music at the start of the film as Zuckerberg walks through Havard sets up the tone of... More the entire film.

The sound editing and mixing is fantastic, the nightclub scene is a clinic in filmmaking as we can clearly hear the conversation with loud music blaring - Something that may go unappreciated by some.

However there are some lazy spots - Such as the use of the female lawyer to explain some things - The audience is getting told rather than shown. It seems like she is simply there to book-end a statement made by Rooney Mara's character at the beginning of the story. The female lawyer character just seems lazy.

Also, the plotline of the asian girlfriend seemed to come and go as it pleased which creates possibly one of the worst scenes in a good movie this year as she sets the bedroom of Andrew Garfield's character alight.

Aside from those two points, The Social Network is a clinic in filmmaking. Music, editing, sounds, cinematography, writing, direction with an incredibly strong lead performance - it is everything you want in a film.

8/10 - 4 StarsHide


BY Gansqa wannabe

I would have to say not many people would enjoy this. But as a happy geek I found it quite amusing and somewhat harsh. I hope Mark wasn't that much of a jerk in real life.


But not that entertaining


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The Press Reviews

96% of critics recommend.
Rotten Tomatoes Score. More reviews on Rotten Tomatoes

  • David Fincher's film has the rare quality of being not only as smart as its brilliant hero, but in the same way. It is cocksure, impatient, cold, exciting and instinctively perceptive. Full Review

  • Absolutely riveting examination of the social media phenomenon that is Facebook. Full Review

  • I just came across a lovely quote from the writer of The Social Network, and it seems it's a fair place to start this review - fair because the real star of this film is the script. Full Review

  • A rich, understated character drama that gleefully exposes the petty playground politics at the centre of one of the internet-era's most bitter court cases. Full Review

  • David Fincher captures the spiteful personalities and hyperactive spirit of the age with the story of Facebook's creation Full Review

  • David Fincher captures the spiteful personalities and hyperactive spirit of the age with the story of Facebook's creation Full Review

  • The film comes down to a mesmerizing portrait of a man who in any other age would perhaps be deemed nuts or useless, but in the Internet age has this mental agility to transform an idea into an empire. Full Review

  • One of cinema’s greatest strengths is that it can make the ordinary and mundane exciting and adventurous. It’s a rare thing though, and when you see it, sometimes it’s difficult to figure out how it happened. In the case of The Social Network there’s no trick. Full Review

  • Smartly written by Aaron Sorkin, directed to within an inch of its life by David Fincher and anchored by a perfectly pitched performance by Jesse Eisenberg, The Social Network is a barn-burner of a tale that unfolds at a splendid clip. Full Review

  • When Mr. Eisenberg makes Mark's face go blank, the character seems scarily emptied out: it's a subtly great, at times unsettling, performance Full Review

  • But make no mistake, whether the movie is fair or horribly unfair - I know nothing of the actual facts and can't make that determination - its portrait of Zuckerberg is a hatchet job of epic and perhaps lasting proportions. Full Review

  • “Every creation myth needs a devil,” notes one of Mark Zuckerberg’s attorneys as the Facebook creator resigns himself to legal defeat. The Social Network is the story of one man’s God complex igniting his demonisation. It’s what happens when anarchy is assimilated – how rebellion gets contorted into money. Full Review

  • “Every creation myth needs a devil,” notes one of Mark Zuckerberg’s attorneys as the Facebook creator resigns himself to legal defeat. The Social Network is the story of one man’s God complex igniting his demonisation. It’s what happens when anarchy is assimilated – how rebellion gets contorted into money. Full Review

  • Continues Fincher's fascinating transition from genre filmmaker extraordinaire to indelible chronicler of our times Full Review

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