45 Years

45 Years

45 Years

Geoff and Kate Mercer (Tom Courtenay and Charlotte Rampling in award-winning performances) are a week away from their 45 year wedding anniversary. What should be a time of celebration for this childless couple enjoying rural retirement is derailed by the news that the body of Geoff's first love has been found, preserved in the glacier she fell into fifty years earlier.

While Geoff is visibly rattled, the effect on Kate is more subtle. As she explores her husband's photo archives, making fresh discoveries about him while trawling through his past, Kate finds herself overcome by jealousy and doubt.

"Outwardly, everything is business as usual. But the camera cautiously registers how a well-tuned coexistence is going out of kilter. Whether over a shared breakfast or a lonely wander through the town, Kate feels more and more like a stranger in her own life. 45 Years tells the story of two people who, caught up in unexpected emotions, are forced to bolster themselves against unfamiliar feelings and, in doing so, have the rug pulled out from under their feet. After 45 years, which feeling will prevail on the couple's big day?" (Berlin International Film Festival)

Best Actress (Charlotte Rampling) and Best Actor (Tom Courtenay) at Berlin International Film Festival 2015.
2015Rating: M, Sex scenes and offensive language94 minsUK
Drama
94%
want to see

Reviews & comments

Flicks, Matt Glasby

Flicks, Matt Glasby

flicks

The mechanics of a happy marriage are subtly put to the scalpel in writer/director Andrew Haigh’s measured drama, an ever-so-British response to the likes of Amour. Based on David Constantine’s short story In Another Country, it finds Kate (Charlotte Rampling) and Geoff (Tom Courtenay) living out a contented retirement in the countryside and preparing to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary.

4.0

Five stars but will only entertain certain types of movie goers

I may be in the minority but I loved 45 Years (and I'm a twenty something) as it's the type of movie that will leave you contemplating certain scenes, days later. The director doesn't spoon feed their audience, two people could leave the theater having totally different ideas about exactly what went on in Kate's mind. It may not be the easiest movie to...

5.0

Thought provoking, NOT crowd pleasing !

If you think for a movie to be great it needs to be easy watching and happy, or be fast and action packed then this is definitely not a film for you. Far removed from movies that want to seduce at all costs, 45 YEARS speaks to the heart of the audience by playing the card of the disruptive element that shakes a gently established life, revealing the...

5.0

Beautifully gloomy!

An interesting look at the dynamics of a married couple as they plan for their 45th wedding anniversary whilst they both unravel with the news that the husband's ex girlfriend's body has been found in the Swiss Alps where she fell to her death. The Subtle way the story is told through day to day moments is clever and the acting very good. The authentic way...

3.0

Hit and a Miss

I saw this film at festival last year. I can't place my finger on what it is that I really didn't like about it. Ultimately I couldn't feel sympathy for either of the main characters. It might be a moot point as I know other who really enjoyed it. While Secret and Lies showed people facing the secrets of the past, this film seemed to gloss over aspects...

2.0

Kate Roger what were you thinking

We went to this movie as I usually really agree with Kate's reviews. In this case not so much. Seriously how I watched to the end I don't know. This was almost worse than watching paint dry. I kid you not. A depressing look at a couple in old age who seem to have a meaningless existence that moves with glacial slowness. The movie's premise is thin, the...

1.0

Depressing

After watching the film came out depressed that it shows what to expect from life, found it very slow and parts filled with pointless scenes.

2.0

Glacial

I'm afraid we were disappointed with this film despite the high caliber cast. The whole film revolves round a single incident, and even that happenned 45+ years ago. So it felt just padded out and slow.

3.0
Variety

Variety

press

Haigh's casting choices for the two lead roles pay rich dividends.

Time Out

Time Out

press

It's a film of small moments and tiny gestures that leaves a very, very big impression.

5.0
The Telegraph

The Telegraph

press

Haigh’s very fine, classically modulated film keeps these questions alive until literally its last shot, and lets them jangle their way through you for days afterwards.

5.0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Mr. Courtenay, a naturally demonstrative actor, registers a convincing blend of longing, confusion and shame. Ms. Rampling, a stiller, deeper-running pool, conveys emotions so strange and intense that they don't quite have names.

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

A moving and absorbing drama featuring two performers offering a lifetime's wisdom and technique in their performances.

4.0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

A quietly explosive film, a potent drama with a nuanced feel for subtlety and emotional complications.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Do not expect blazing emotional fireworks, just finely calibrated performances and deep reserves of inner torment.

Herald Sun

Herald Sun

press

A searing drama charged with raw, yet poignant fury.

4.0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Full of restraint, from both its director and leads, this is a quiet gem with the power to move.

4.0
Flicks, Matt Glasby

Flicks, Matt Glasby

flicks

The mechanics of a happy marriage are subtly put to the scalpel in writer/director Andrew Haigh’s measured drama, an ever-so-British response to the likes of Amour. Based on David Constantine’s short story In Another Country, it finds Kate (Charlotte Rampling) and Geoff (Tom Courtenay) living out a contented retirement in the countryside and preparing to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary.

4.0
Variety

Variety

press

Haigh's casting choices for the two lead roles pay rich dividends.

Time Out

Time Out

press

It's a film of small moments and tiny gestures that leaves a very, very big impression.

5.0
The Telegraph

The Telegraph

press

Haigh’s very fine, classically modulated film keeps these questions alive until literally its last shot, and lets them jangle their way through you for days afterwards.

5.0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Mr. Courtenay, a naturally demonstrative actor, registers a convincing blend of longing, confusion and shame. Ms. Rampling, a stiller, deeper-running pool, conveys emotions so strange and intense that they don't quite have names.

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

A moving and absorbing drama featuring two performers offering a lifetime's wisdom and technique in their performances.

4.0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

A quietly explosive film, a potent drama with a nuanced feel for subtlety and emotional complications.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Do not expect blazing emotional fireworks, just finely calibrated performances and deep reserves of inner torment.

Herald Sun

Herald Sun

press

A searing drama charged with raw, yet poignant fury.

4.0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Full of restraint, from both its director and leads, this is a quiet gem with the power to move.

4.0

Five stars but will only entertain certain types of movie goers

I may be in the minority but I loved 45 Years (and I'm a twenty something) as it's the type of movie that will leave you contemplating certain scenes, days later. The director doesn't spoon feed their audience, two people could leave the theater having totally different ideas about exactly what went on in Kate's mind. It may not be the easiest movie to...

5.0

Thought provoking, NOT crowd pleasing !

If you think for a movie to be great it needs to be easy watching and happy, or be fast and action packed then this is definitely not a film for you. Far removed from movies that want to seduce at all costs, 45 YEARS speaks to the heart of the audience by playing the card of the disruptive element that shakes a gently established life, revealing the...

5.0

Beautifully gloomy!

An interesting look at the dynamics of a married couple as they plan for their 45th wedding anniversary whilst they both unravel with the news that the husband's ex girlfriend's body has been found in the Swiss Alps where she fell to her death. The Subtle way the story is told through day to day moments is clever and the acting very good. The authentic...

3.0

Hit and a Miss

I saw this film at festival last year. I can't place my finger on what it is that I really didn't like about it. Ultimately I couldn't feel sympathy for either of the main characters. It might be a moot point as I know other who really enjoyed it. While Secret and Lies showed people facing the secrets of the past, this film seemed to gloss over aspects...

2.0

Kate Roger what were you thinking

We went to this movie as I usually really agree with Kate's reviews. In this case not so much. Seriously how I watched to the end I don't know. This was almost worse than watching paint dry. I kid you not. A depressing look at a couple in old age who seem to have a meaningless existence that moves with glacial slowness. The movie's premise is thin, the...

1.0

Depressing

After watching the film came out depressed that it shows what to expect from life, found it very slow and parts filled with pointless scenes.

2.0

Glacial

I'm afraid we were disappointed with this film despite the high caliber cast. The whole film revolves round a single incident, and even that happenned 45+ years ago. So it felt just padded out and slow.

3.0