Adam's Apples

Adam's Apples

Adam's Apples

Anders Thomas Jensen's (writer of  Brothers and After the Wedding) 2005 black comedy. A fable on the nature of good and evil featuring a spectacularly grumpy Neo-Nazi (Ulrich Thomsen) and an irksome priest (Mads Mikkelsen). Adam, an ex-con, is sent to serve out his community service at the church centre run by the earnest Ivan, who sets him a task: to bake an apple pie. Sounds easy but it proves anything but.

2008Rating: R16, Violence and offensive language93 minsDenmark, GermanyDanish with English subtitles
ComedyDrama
16%
want to see

Reviews & comments

Variety

Variety

press

A funny, politically incorrect and, somewhere deep down, thoughtful black comedy, "Adam's Apples" is the third and final film in helmer-writer Anders Thomas Jensen's excellent trilogy centered on oddballs and misfits in Denmark.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

The Danish writer and director Anders Thomas Jensen's 2005 feature, "Adam's Apples" — about a neo-Nazi sentenced to community service at a rural church run by a sunshine-and-lollipops vicar — is one of the latest examples of the post-"Pulp Fiction" bloody comedy. It's also one of the weirdest, mixing glib humor with dead-serious spiritual inquiry.

0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

A surreal parable punctuated with violent episodes is shockingly hilarious but empty-hearted.

3.0
0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

Pitched somewhere between religious parable and slapstick, the black-hearted satire "Adam's Apples" has something important to say about the nature of redemption. Or perhaps it just wants to seem like it does. Like his countryman Lars von Trier, the Danish writer-director Anders Thomas Jensen mixes spiritual inquiry with shell game, never quite tipping his hand as to what's sincere and what's said with a smirk.

0
Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

Based on the Old Testament Book of Job, Jensen's first-class script mixes biblical allegories with a bizarre collection of quirky and quixotic characters. And central to the tale's success is another stand-out performance from Mikkelsen (After the Wedding, Casino Royale). Unflappably cool, calm and chatty, his scene-stealing priest delivers a sermon-ful of quotable lines - ``Evil? That's awfully rude to write that on someone's CV'' _ and a host of memorable moments (breaking off counselling with an alcoholic, pregnant woman to complain about an uneven number of cookies offered to them). Throw in Thomsen's (Mostly Martha) sensitive tough-guy and Jeppe Kaas' playful yet haunting score, and

Apples is a tasty, slightly-spicy treat well worth sampling.

4.0
0

Review

0
Variety

Variety

press

A funny, politically incorrect and, somewhere deep down, thoughtful black comedy, "Adam's Apples" is the third and final film in helmer-writer Anders Thomas Jensen's excellent trilogy centered on oddballs and misfits in Denmark.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

The Danish writer and director Anders Thomas Jensen's 2005 feature, "Adam's Apples" — about a neo-Nazi sentenced to community service at a rural church run by a sunshine-and-lollipops vicar — is one of the latest examples of the post-"Pulp Fiction" bloody comedy. It's also one of the weirdest, mixing glib humor with dead-serious spiritual inquiry.

0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

A surreal parable punctuated with violent episodes is shockingly hilarious but empty-hearted.

3.0
0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

Pitched somewhere between religious parable and slapstick, the black-hearted satire "Adam's Apples" has something important to say about the nature of redemption. Or perhaps it just wants to seem like it does. Like his countryman Lars von Trier, the Danish writer-director Anders Thomas Jensen mixes spiritual inquiry with shell game, never quite tipping his hand as to what's sincere and what's said with a smirk.

0
Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

Based on the Old Testament Book of Job, Jensen's first-class script mixes biblical allegories with a bizarre collection of quirky and quixotic characters. And central to the tale's success is another stand-out performance from Mikkelsen (After the Wedding, Casino Royale). Unflappably cool, calm and chatty, his scene-stealing priest delivers a sermon-ful of quotable lines - ``Evil? That's awfully rude to write that on someone's CV'' _ and a host of memorable moments (breaking off counselling with an alcoholic, pregnant woman to complain about an uneven number of cookies offered to them). Throw in Thomsen's (Mostly Martha) sensitive tough-guy and Jeppe Kaas' playful yet haunting score, and

Apples is a tasty, slightly-spicy treat well worth sampling.

4.0
0

Review

0