Babylon A.D.

Babylon A.D.

Babylon A.D.

Vin Diesel is back, and this time he's Toorop, a war veteran turned mercenary who takes on a high risk mission of escorting a woman from Russia to China. What he doesn't know is that the journey will carry an extra level of danger due to the identity of his companion. She is in fact host to an organism that a cult wants to harvest in order to genetically modify a new messiah. Interestingly, a couple of big names from world cinema, Michelle Yeoh and Gerard Depredieu appear, not the usual suspects to co-star in a Vin Diesel sci-fi action fest.

If you believe in omens… Babylon AD went so far over schedule and budget that the production's insurance company had to step in and bail it out. See director Mathiew Kassovitz's comments about the film's production HERE.

2008Rating: M, Violence & Offensive Language90 minsUSA, France
ActionScience FictionThriller
?
want to see?

Reviews & comments

Roooobish!

Kassovitz shown real talent with La Haine. Pity for that adaptation because Dantec's books are really worth reading if you can find the English edition. Read "Les racines du mal" (The Roots of Evil), "L? o? tombent les anges" (Where the Angels fall), and Babylon Babies of course. These are all post-apocalyptic novels. Maurice Dantec and Pierre Boule (Planet...

1.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

A noisier, costlier version of "Children of Men," yet lacking that film's social-political significance and jaw-dropping direction.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Our judgments, in any case, may be superfluous, since the director, Mathieu Kassovitz, has already publicly described it as "pure violence and stupidity."

0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

This is not a terrible movie, but it's too familiar by half and too confusing by a third.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

A towering heap of nihilistic nonsense that plays like a cornball "Children of God."

0
Film Threat

Film Threat

press

Wants to be three different films at one time but sadly never asks much from Diesel other than to grunt, stomp around, and reprise the role that made him a star.

1.0
0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Brawny but brainless techno-twaddle.

2.0
0
Dominion Post

Dominion Post

press

With a face like a dropped pie, the eyes of a rabid weasel and the body of a small truck, Mrs Diesel's boy Vin has still managed to parlay his limited chops into a respectable career.

1.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

A noisier, costlier version of "Children of Men," yet lacking that film's social-political significance and jaw-dropping direction.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Our judgments, in any case, may be superfluous, since the director, Mathieu Kassovitz, has already publicly described it as "pure violence and stupidity."

0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

This is not a terrible movie, but it's too familiar by half and too confusing by a third.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

A towering heap of nihilistic nonsense that plays like a cornball "Children of God."

0
Film Threat

Film Threat

press

Wants to be three different films at one time but sadly never asks much from Diesel other than to grunt, stomp around, and reprise the role that made him a star.

1.0
0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Brawny but brainless techno-twaddle.

2.0
0
Dominion Post

Dominion Post

press

With a face like a dropped pie, the eyes of a rabid weasel and the body of a small truck, Mrs Diesel's boy Vin has still managed to parlay his limited chops into a respectable career.

1.0
0

Roooobish!

Kassovitz shown real talent with La Haine. Pity for that adaptation because Dantec's books are really worth reading if you can find the English edition. Read "Les racines du mal" (The Roots of Evil), "L? o? tombent les anges" (Where the Angels fall), and Babylon Babies of course. These are all post-apocalyptic novels. Maurice Dantec and Pierre Boule...

1.0
0