Being Venice

Being Venice

Being Venice

Romantic drama and character study, the debut feature from New Zealand-born, Aussie-based filmmaker Miro Bilbrough who describes the film as a "love letter to Sydney". Struggling poet Venice (Alice McConnell, Jewboy) is having trouble with the men in her life. On the night her ex-hippy dad Arthur (Garry McDonald, The Rage in Placid Lake) arrives in Sydney to stay on the sofa of her tiny apartment for a week, she is dumped by her lover and begins an ill-advised affair with her charismatic best friend Lenny (Simon Stone, Kokoda). Arthur carefully ignores the turmoil swirling around his daughter's life until she confronts him about the childhood that still pains her.

2012Rating: M, Nudity, offensive language & sexual content89 minsAustralia
DramaRomance
33%
want to see

Reviews & comments

Flicks, Aaron Yap

Flicks, Aaron Yap

flicks

Being Venice reveals Sydney to be a viable source for locations of glowing, near-otherworldly Edward Hopper-quoting prettiness, but that’s practically all that’s interesting about Aussie-based NZ-born filmmaker/poet Miro Bilbrough’s feature debut. This muddled, largely undistinguished navel-gazing snore-fest is Sundance pablum of the most precious, mannered kind, where we’re left to sort through the banal emotional cataclysms of characters whose inscrutable behaviour remains best comprehended by their creator.

1.0
Variety

Variety

press

Buoyed by witty observations of human foibles and classy visuals by lenser Bonnie Elliott, but failing to muster much emotional heft, the picture represents a mixed feature bow for writer-helmer Miro Bilbrough.

Screen Daily

Screen Daily

press

A thoughtful, adult character piece — leisurely paced, female centred, lushly designed.

SBS

SBS

press

Sadly disappointing full-length feature debut.

2.0
Flicks, Aaron Yap

Flicks, Aaron Yap

flicks

Being Venice reveals Sydney to be a viable source for locations of glowing, near-otherworldly Edward Hopper-quoting prettiness, but that’s practically all that’s interesting about Aussie-based NZ-born filmmaker/poet Miro Bilbrough’s feature debut. This muddled, largely undistinguished navel-gazing snore-fest is Sundance pablum of the most precious, mannered kind, where we’re left to sort through the banal emotional cataclysms of characters whose inscrutable behaviour remains best comprehended by their creator.

1.0
Variety

Variety

press

Buoyed by witty observations of human foibles and classy visuals by lenser Bonnie Elliott, but failing to muster much emotional heft, the picture represents a mixed feature bow for writer-helmer Miro Bilbrough.

Screen Daily

Screen Daily

press

A thoughtful, adult character piece — leisurely paced, female centred, lushly designed.

SBS

SBS

press

Sadly disappointing full-length feature debut.

2.0

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