Big Eyes

Big Eyes

Big Eyes

Tim Burton directs the biographical drama of painter Margaret Keane (Amy Adams), set in the 1950s. Follows her success as an artist, and eventual legal issues with her husband (Christoph Waltz) who takes credit for her work in the 1960s. From the scriptwriters of Ed Wood, Man on the Moon and The People vs. Larry Flynt.

Best Actress (Comedy/Musical) for Adams, Golden Globes 2015
2014Rating: M106 minsUSA
DramaTrue Story & Biography

Streaming (3 Providers)

Big Eyes / Reviews

Flicks, Giles Hardie

Flicks, Giles Hardie

Enough is enough. No more easy passes for filmmakers who succeed in finding a fascinating real life story. Well done on the research and contract signing and all that, but the thing is, we’d also like you to deliver a good film.

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Variety

Variety

This relatively straightforward dramatic outing for Tim Burton is too broadly conceived to penetrate the mystery at the heart of the Keanes’ unhappy marriage

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Total Film

Total Film

[Waltz is] more caricature than character, and Burton proves unable to harness his energy as well as Tarantino did.

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Time Out

Time Out

Burton lets Waltz run wild, sucking the air out of every scene with his hysterics, and the always-endearing Adams is left looking like a rabbit in the headlights.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

This movie wants to be an oil painting, but ends up being more of a mass-produced, though good-quality print.

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The Dissolve

The Dissolve

Big Eyes contains comedy and tragedy, too, but they pair much less agreeably here, in part because each of the film’s two protagonists belongs much more to one world than the other.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Exerts an enjoyably eccentric appeal while also painting a troubling picture of male dominance and female submissiveness a half-century ago.

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Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly

Despite its sharp feminist sting, Big Eyes never loses its light touch.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Tim Burton’s return to real-life storytelling is entertaining but flawed.

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