Blade of the Immortal

Blade of the Immortal

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Blade of the Immortal

The 100th film by Japanese master Takashi Miike is an irreverent and gory samurai film about a skilled warrior who attains immortality.

"Based on a popular manga and selected to screen at Cannes 2017, Blade of the Immortal is the story of Manji (Japanese heartthrob Takuya Kimura), a warrior who is cursed with immortality after a legendary battle. When his sister is killed, Manji takes brutal revenge on her killers. His own injuries are tended to by an 800-year-old nun, who also bestows upon Manji the power to self-heal. He finds himself unable to die until he has killed a very large number of evil men, and the scene is set for the bloody mayhem for which Miike is known and loved." (Sydney Film Festival)

2017Rating: R16, Violence & sexual violence140 minsJapan, UKJapanese with English subtitles
ActionWorld Cinema
88%
want to see

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Reviews & comments

Flicks, Tony Stamp

Flicks, Tony Stamp

flicks

Blade of the Immortal opens in media res, as Takuya Kimura’s samurai lays waste to his attackers. The sounds of steel and sliced flesh are familiar from Takashi Miike’s previous feudal epics 13 Assassins and Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai. It’s shot in gorgeous black and white. There’s an unfortunate joke about a horse turd.

3.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

The 100th feature by genre master Takashi Miike transcends conventions of Japanese swordplay films with both fantasy and graphic violence.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Though not nearly as mindful or meaty as Mr. Miike's 2011 triumph, "13 Assassins," "Blade" is creatively gory fun.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

The veteran Japanese director’s 100th film concerns a warrior who is able to grow back his own limbs. It is undeniably gross, but also a lot of fun

4.0
0
Stuff

Stuff

press

This film is a rollicking, hilarious, blood-drenched relentless crowd pleaser for pretty much every one of its 141 minutes.

4.0
0
Screen Daily

Screen Daily

press

Miike is on fine form, never losing his sense of humour, or sense of character, even as yet another axe is embedded in yet another skull.

0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

Miike retains his twisted sense of humour, with mangling and disemboweling deployed for comic effect. And after 99 movies, he certainly knows how to make action memorable.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

The new film is more irreverent than either of those earlier ones, and less memorable, though there are still pleasures to be had...

0
Flicks, Tony Stamp

Flicks, Tony Stamp

flicks

Blade of the Immortal opens in media res, as Takuya Kimura’s samurai lays waste to his attackers. The sounds of steel and sliced flesh are familiar from Takashi Miike’s previous feudal epics 13 Assassins and Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai. It’s shot in gorgeous black and white. There’s an unfortunate joke about a horse turd.

3.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

The 100th feature by genre master Takashi Miike transcends conventions of Japanese swordplay films with both fantasy and graphic violence.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Though not nearly as mindful or meaty as Mr. Miike's 2011 triumph, "13 Assassins," "Blade" is creatively gory fun.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

The veteran Japanese director’s 100th film concerns a warrior who is able to grow back his own limbs. It is undeniably gross, but also a lot of fun

4.0
0
Stuff

Stuff

press

This film is a rollicking, hilarious, blood-drenched relentless crowd pleaser for pretty much every one of its 141 minutes.

4.0
0
Screen Daily

Screen Daily

press

Miike is on fine form, never losing his sense of humour, or sense of character, even as yet another axe is embedded in yet another skull.

0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

Miike retains his twisted sense of humour, with mangling and disemboweling deployed for comic effect. And after 99 movies, he certainly knows how to make action memorable.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

The new film is more irreverent than either of those earlier ones, and less memorable, though there are still pleasures to be had...

0

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