Frantz

Frantz

Frantz

French art-house helmer François Ozon (In The House) directs Paula Beer and Pierre Niney in a remake of Ernst Lubitsch's 1932 WWI drama, Broken Lullaby.

"Spying a stranger laying a bouquet of roses on her beloved fiancé's grave one day, the quietly grieving Anna (Beer) is both surprised and intrigued. The war has just ended. Anna was engaged to Frantz, who was killed, and the people in her German home town are just beginning to emerge from the shadow of horrendous conflict. Frantz's parents are shattered over their son's death.

"Tentatively, the stranger reveals his identity: he is French, and with the war so raw in everyone's minds, he is clearly not welcome in this small community. Yet it emerges that Adrien (Niney) knew Frantz in the pre-war period, when the two of them became fast friends over their shared love of art and, in particular, music. Anna, along with Frantz's parents, eventually warms to this sensitive Frenchman, who simply wanted to visit the gravesite of his dead friend. But this is only the beginning of a story whose twists and turns take us down emotionally haunting avenues." (Toronto International Film Festival)

Winner of the Marcello Mastroianni Award for Best Young Actress (Beer), 2016 Venice Film Festival.
2016Rating: PG, Violence113 minsFrance, GermanyFrench and German with English subtitles
DramaWarHistoricalFestival & Independent
88%
want to see

Reviews & comments

Variety

Variety

press

The results are oddly more artificial than the 1932 original ['Broken Lullaby'], and considerably less moving.

0
Time Out

Time Out

press

Slightly over-polite, but the sense of festering postwar anger and pain is strong.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

As if shedding a skin, the film shucks off its elegiac, white-gloved manners to explore a slippery realm of secrets, lies and moral uncertainty that eventually leads her to consult a priest for advice on how to proceed.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Ozon is often at his best when working with women, and he has a fabulous talent in Paula Beer to bring his protagonist, Anna, to vivid life. She's stunning in the role.

4.0
0
Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

Francois Ozon's post-WW1 period piece about a German widow and a French solder takes on xenophobic hatred that's as timely as Trump, making Frantz is a film of its time ... and ours.

0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

More than once, "Frantz" hints that it will reveal itself as a homoerotic reworking of "Broken Lullaby." But Ozon has something simpler and no less intriguing up his sleeve

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

[Ozon's] story is one that's subtler and digs deeper while it keeps exploring how both political and personal questions are dealt with within a moral framework and how that framework itself is also open to interpretation.

0

Nations reconcile after war but it is only people who can grant forgiveness. For many, it is an impossible grant that leaves wounds unhealed. This theme dominates the Franco-German film Frantz (2017), a psychological drama about a former soldier’s personal quest for forgiveness. Filmed mostly in black and white, it is a poetically beautiful essay about...

4.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

The results are oddly more artificial than the 1932 original ['Broken Lullaby'], and considerably less moving.

0
Time Out

Time Out

press

Slightly over-polite, but the sense of festering postwar anger and pain is strong.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

As if shedding a skin, the film shucks off its elegiac, white-gloved manners to explore a slippery realm of secrets, lies and moral uncertainty that eventually leads her to consult a priest for advice on how to proceed.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Ozon is often at his best when working with women, and he has a fabulous talent in Paula Beer to bring his protagonist, Anna, to vivid life. She's stunning in the role.

4.0
0
Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

Francois Ozon's post-WW1 period piece about a German widow and a French solder takes on xenophobic hatred that's as timely as Trump, making Frantz is a film of its time ... and ours.

0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

More than once, "Frantz" hints that it will reveal itself as a homoerotic reworking of "Broken Lullaby." But Ozon has something simpler and no less intriguing up his sleeve

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

[Ozon's] story is one that's subtler and digs deeper while it keeps exploring how both political and personal questions are dealt with within a moral framework and how that framework itself is also open to interpretation.

0

Nations reconcile after war but it is only people who can grant forgiveness. For many, it is an impossible grant that leaves wounds unhealed. This theme dominates the Franco-German film Frantz (2017), a psychological drama about a former soldier’s personal quest for forgiveness. Filmed mostly in black and white, it is a poetically beautiful essay about...

4.0
0