From Here to Eternity

From Here to Eternity

From Here to Eternity

Classic WWII drama about the isolated US military men and women stationed in peacetime Hawaii, in the days before the attack on Pearl Harbour. From Here to Eternity swept the 1954 Oscars, winning the most Academy Awards for any picture since Gone With The Wind (1939). Starring Burt Lancaster as Sergeant Milt Warden and Deborah Kerr as Karen, the wife of his commanding officer. The two leads enter into an illicit affair that brings one of the most enduring scenes in cinema history - Lancaster and Kerr’s infamous kissing scene amongst the rolling surf on a Hawaiian beach. More

Elsewhere, Private Robert E. Lee "Prew" Prewitt (Montgomery Clift) is a loner who communicates better with his bugle than he does with words, targeted for persecution by sadistic stockade sergeant Fatso Judson (Ernest Borgnine) for not boxing on his unit's team. Prew's lot is thrown in with Alma Lorene (Donna Reed), good-hearted "hostess" at the euphemistically named brothel The New Congress Club. All the joy and suffering of their everyday lives is swept away by the Japanese attack on the morning of December 7.

Prew's best friend is wisecracking Maggio, played by Frank Sinatra in an Oscar-winning performance that revived his flagging career (a role almost given to Eli Wallach, leading some to speculate that Sinatra's alleged Mafia ties pressured producers to give Sinatra the role, which in turn may have inspired the Johnny Fontane and the horse's head storyline in The Godfather).

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1953Rating: PG118 minsUSA
DramaWarClassic

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From Here to Eternity | Awards

Award Winner
Best Picture, Supporting Actor (Frank Sinatra), Director, Screenplay, Black-and-White Cinematography, Sound and Editing, Academy Awards 1954; Best Director and Supporting Actor (Sinatra), Golden Globes 1954; Special Award winner (Fred Zinnemann), Cannes 1954

From Here to Eternity | Reviews

90%63 reviews

Rotten Tomatoes® Score

All reviews on Rotten Tomatoes
Variety

Variety

It is an important film from any angle, presenting socko entertainment for big business.

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Time Out

Time Out

Zinnemann's flat direction does produce its dull moments.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

A novel whose anger and compassion stirred a postwar reading public as few such works have... a company of sensitive hands have forged a film almost as towering and persuasive as its source.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

I have to say that Clift's plot is far less compelling than Lancaster's and something of the zip goes when Frank Sinatra disappears from the action, sent to the stockade. But what a punch this movie still packs.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Deserving to be seen and remembered for so much more than that kiss, this is old school drama of the highest order.

Full review