Horrible Bosses

Horrible Bosses

Horrible Bosses

All-star black comedy about three friends (Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis) who have despicable, overbearing bosses (Kevin Spacey, Colin Farrell with an awesome comb over and Jennifer Aniston) that make their lives miserable. They decide to do the reasonable thing and murder them.

With the help of "murder consultant" Jamie Foxx, they devise a convoluted and seemingly foolproof plan to rid themselves of their respective employers. One problem: even the best laid plans are only as foolproof as the brains behind them. 

201199 minsUSA
Comedy
Director:
Seth Gordon ('The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters', 'Four Christmases')
Writer:
John Francis DaleyJonathan M. Goldstein
Cast:
Jason BatemanJason Sudeikis

Streaming (2 Providers)

Horrible Bosses / Reviews

Variety

Variety

The manner in which the central scheme plays out is predictably moronic, vulgar and juvenile, though the parties involved just about make up for it.

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Total Film

Total Film

Frantic, funny and packed full of big names behaving badly – Ioan Gruffudd, OMG...

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The New York Times

The New York Times

The laughter is mean but also oddly pure: it expels shame and leaves you feeling dizzy, a little embarrassed and also exhilarated, kind of like the cocaine that two of the main characters consume by accident.

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Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Funny and dirty in about that order.

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Otago Daily Times

Otago Daily Times

Spacey, Farrell and Aniston are a blast as the horrible bosses.

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New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

Gordon's cast of big names help cover some gaping holes in the plot. Distracted by Aniston's new femme fatale persona, and how a well-oiled comb-over renders Farrell barely recognisable, audiences can ignore the odd over-explained joke, under-explained tangent, and the fact that just as the story starts to crumble, the Indian call centre guy saves the day.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

The lameness of the gags and dialogue and the film's frequent deep dives for the bottom at the expense of real comedy speak to desperation in Hollywood to figure out the audience for contemporary naughty comedy.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

These bosses cannot justify either murder or lasting comic memories, fatally compromising a farce that could have been great but ends up merely mediocre.

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Dominion Post

Dominion Post

Tired at the end of a long week, I laughed myself stupid at it. You probably will too.

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A.V. Club

A.V. Club

In the film's funniest scene, a coked-up Day rocks out to The Ting Tings' "That's Not My Name" in a car in a state of ecstatic frenzy.

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