I, Daniel Blake

I, Daniel Blake

STREAMING NOW3 Providers
I, Daniel Blake

Winner of the Palme d'Or at Cannes Film Festival 2016, this is Ken Loach's drama about a 59-year-old carpenter in North-East England who falls ill and requires state assistance for disability. While he endeavours to overcome the red tape involved in getting this assistance, he meets single mother Katie.

Outstanding British Film, BAFTAs 2017; Palme d'Or winner, Cannes Film Festival 2016
2016Rating: M, Offensive language and adult themes100 minsUK
DramaFestival & Independent
Director:
Ken Loach ('The Wind That Shakes the Barley', 'Kes', 'The Angels' Share', 'Sweet Sixteen')
Writer:
Paul Laverty
Cast:
Dave JohnsHayley SquiresDylan McKiernanBriana ShannSharon Percy
96%
want to see

Streaming (3 Providers)

Reviews & comments

Variety

Variety

press

One of Loach's finest films, a drama of tender devastation that tells its story with an unblinking neorealist simplicity that goes right back to the plainspoken purity of Vittorio De Sica.

0
Total Film

Total Film

press

The 80-year-old director still has plenty of fire in his belly. Warm, belligerent and, in places, unbearably moving.

4.0
0
Time Out

Time Out

press

A spare film, muted in colour - and all the more powerful and urgent for it.

4.0
0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

This film intervenes in the messy, ugly world of poverty with the secular intention of making us see that it really is happening, and in a prosperous nation, too. I, Daniel Blake is a movie with a fierce, simple dignity of its own.

4.0
0
Stuff

Stuff

press

If you're not going to see I, Daniel Blake, then don't bother telling me that you're a fan of good films. Because you're not.

4.0
0
SBS

SBS

press

A fierce and often funny polemic designed to leave a lump in your throat and a fire in your belly.

4.0
0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

It's funny too in a if-you-didn't-laugh-you'd-cry kind of way.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

While the framework and perspective are familiar, the veteran Brit director's films can still have the power to grip us in an emotional chokehold.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Loach scans the contemporary landscape, and instead of a firebrand approach of stereotype, delivers a film of immense sadness.

4.0
0

If film is a mirror on society then the sheer volume of recent movies about the ugliness of the post-GFC world is a reflection of the scale of devastation it has caused. Most are essays in poverty that explore the loss of humanity for ordinary people. The film I, Daniel Blake (2016) is another in this genre. It is an intense portrait of an ordinary man who...

4.0
0

Some critics have accused I, Daniel Blake of being too schematic - of skewing the Kafkaesque convolutions of Britain’s welfare system so devastatingly against the titular character that his situation becomes unbelievable. Well, those critics are partially correct, but they’re also overlooking the fact that the heightened nature of Daniel Blake’s situation...

4.0
0

A classic Ken Loach movie that presents what life is like when money becomes skint due to circumstances. An eye opener for those never had to deal with social services and how the very system set up to support the vulnerable can backfire through bureacracy. Great acting and quite engrossing. Not a fast pace movie but not slow or dragging either. Enjoyable...

3.0
0

I loved this film, although some may call it depressing. It is not the traditional Hollywood, predictable storyline. It is about about real people, and makes you think about society and the direction some countries are going. Highly recommended

5.0
0

I, DANIEL BLAKE Ken Loach’s Kafkaesque nightmare of bureaucracy gone batshit crazy is a bleak, brutal and bloody infuriating journey through a dis-United Kingdom, and the death throes of the Welfare State. It’s a damning drama, lifted by touching humanity, humour and spirit, as embodied by Paul Laverty’s script and a committed cast acting their socks...

4.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

One of Loach's finest films, a drama of tender devastation that tells its story with an unblinking neorealist simplicity that goes right back to the plainspoken purity of Vittorio De Sica.

0
Total Film

Total Film

press

The 80-year-old director still has plenty of fire in his belly. Warm, belligerent and, in places, unbearably moving.

4.0
0
Time Out

Time Out

press

A spare film, muted in colour - and all the more powerful and urgent for it.

4.0
0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

This film intervenes in the messy, ugly world of poverty with the secular intention of making us see that it really is happening, and in a prosperous nation, too. I, Daniel Blake is a movie with a fierce, simple dignity of its own.

4.0
0
Stuff

Stuff

press

If you're not going to see I, Daniel Blake, then don't bother telling me that you're a fan of good films. Because you're not.

4.0
0
SBS

SBS

press

A fierce and often funny polemic designed to leave a lump in your throat and a fire in your belly.

4.0
0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

It's funny too in a if-you-didn't-laugh-you'd-cry kind of way.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

While the framework and perspective are familiar, the veteran Brit director's films can still have the power to grip us in an emotional chokehold.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Loach scans the contemporary landscape, and instead of a firebrand approach of stereotype, delivers a film of immense sadness.

4.0
0

If film is a mirror on society then the sheer volume of recent movies about the ugliness of the post-GFC world is a reflection of the scale of devastation it has caused. Most are essays in poverty that explore the loss of humanity for ordinary people. The film I, Daniel Blake (2016) is another in this genre. It is an intense portrait of an ordinary man...

4.0
0

Some critics have accused I, Daniel Blake of being too schematic - of skewing the Kafkaesque convolutions of Britain’s welfare system so devastatingly against the titular character that his situation becomes unbelievable. Well, those critics are partially correct, but they’re also overlooking the fact that the heightened nature of Daniel Blake’s situation...

4.0
0

A classic Ken Loach movie that presents what life is like when money becomes skint due to circumstances. An eye opener for those never had to deal with social services and how the very system set up to support the vulnerable can backfire through bureacracy. Great acting and quite engrossing. Not a fast pace movie but not slow or dragging either....

3.0
0

I loved this film, although some may call it depressing. It is not the traditional Hollywood, predictable storyline. It is about about real people, and makes you think about society and the direction some countries are going. Highly recommended

5.0
0

I, DANIEL BLAKE Ken Loach’s Kafkaesque nightmare of bureaucracy gone batshit crazy is a bleak, brutal and bloody infuriating journey through a dis-United Kingdom, and the death throes of the Welfare State. It’s a damning drama, lifted by touching humanity, humour and spirit, as embodied by Paul Laverty’s script and a committed cast acting their socks...

4.0
0