I, Frankenstein

I, Frankenstein

I, Frankenstein

Aaron Eckhart plays Frankenstein's monster, drawn into a conflict between heaven and hell when demonic forces seek his immortality. Based on the Darkstorm graphic novel depicting what happened after the events of Mary Shelley's 1818 novel. From the director of Tomorrow, When the War Began.

As if Frankenstein's monster didn't have it tough enough, moments after burying his creator in the early 18th century he is attacked by demons and only saved by the intervention of winged rescuers. What he then discovers is a war that has been raging for millenia between demons and the transforming gargoyles of heaven, the latter not only proving to be his saviour but giving him his freedom and a name - Adam.

In the present day, Adam pursues the demons he knows are seeking him and his immortality, but gets caught between the two spiritual forces once more when the demons intensify their efforts to find him. Led by Prince Naberius (Bill Nighy) the forces of darkness have almost discovered the key to reanimating the dead and Frankenstein's creation may provide the missing piece to a puzzle that will result in mankind's damnation.

2014Rating: M, Fantasy violence92 minsUSA, Australia
FantasyScience FictionThriller

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I, Frankenstein / Reviews

Flicks, Steve Newall

Flicks, Steve Newall

Ay-yi-yi, Frankenstein. Sure, his monster has always been a stitched together assemblage of body parts, but despite never actually having a soul in the first place, Frankenstein’s creation has never been quite as soulless as this. That’s not just the monster’s fault, or that of Aaron Eckhart who plays him, the buck stopping with everyone involved in this whole unfortunate exercise.

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Variety

Variety

Utterly witless, listless, sparkless and senseless.

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Total Film

Total Film

He's alive! But you might wish he wasn't after seeing this knuckle-headed fantasy.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

The blinkered screenplay and indifferent performances fail to lift the eschatology and self-searching off the page.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

One more run around that boringly realised, CGI-reliant, blue-grey netherverse that takes enduring fantasy creations as the basis for barely functioning multiplex-filler.

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The Dissolve

The Dissolve

While it’s nothing new and lacks individualistic touches, it’s still solid trashy fun as an overwrought superhero origin story.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Employs a strictly humorless, gothic approach to the material that makes one long for the satirical touches of James Whale, let alone Mel Brooks.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Back to the drawing board for the mad scientists who cobbled this together. Five parts bad to one part camp nonsense.

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