Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Culinary-doco about an 85-year-old sushi legend.

"Jiro Ono is a legend in his field. His Sukiyabashi Jiro sushi bar in Tokyo’s Ginza subway station seats only ten, but it’s widely considered the best place for sushi in Japan. Customers book as much as a year ahead for a full meal costing upward of 30,0000 yen ($460). Says restaurant critic Masuhiro Yamamoto, 'Nobody has ever had a bad experience there.'" (Source: NZ International Film Festival 2011)

2011Rating: G83 minsJapanJapanese with English subtitles
Documentary
Director:
David Gelb (feature debut)
Cast:
Jiro Ono
36%
want to see

Streaming (1 Providers)

Reviews & comments

ANOTHER COOKING FILM

But worth a watch.

3.0

Must-watch for foodies and workaholics alike

Anyone who considers themselves a foodie or appreciates a fine work ethic will definitely enjoy this film. It paints a complete picture of what's involved in creating some of the best sushi you could have in the world, from sourcing only the best seafood at specialist vendors at the famous Tsujiki Market, to demonstrating how an octopus is massaged for 50...

5.0

Eat before you go...

Quite a facinating tale of a very focussed (read: obssessive) man and how he creates the world's best sushi. The fact that his restaurant is tiny, sushi chefs all over Tokyo try to emulate him, and his esteem in the community all tell of a man dedicated to his art. Well worth a watch, but make sure you eat before you go.

4.0
Time Out

Time Out

press

A dream, indeed. Sure to delight foodies and cinephiles alike.

5.0
Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

press

This is a portrait of tunnel vision. Jiro exists to make sushi. Sushi exists to be made by Jiro.

New York Post

New York Post

press

The real star of the movie is the delectable sushi itself. Viewers will be tempted to hop the next flight to Tokyo, but probably will have to settle for a Japanese eatery closer to home.

New York Daily News

New York Daily News

press

An extraordinary morsel of a movie, and yes, you'll want sushi afterward. But it won't taste like Jiro's.

3.0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

Even if you don't fancy raw fish, "Jiro" is a captivating film.

A.V. Club

A.V. Club

press

Even at a brief 81 minutes, Jiro Dreams Of Sushi runs a little longer than it needs to, given that it’s making the same point over and over: that it takes uncommon dedication to repeat the same steps every day for decades, always looking for ways to make the process better, not easier.

Time Out

Time Out

press

A dream, indeed. Sure to delight foodies and cinephiles alike.

5.0
Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

press

This is a portrait of tunnel vision. Jiro exists to make sushi. Sushi exists to be made by Jiro.

New York Post

New York Post

press

The real star of the movie is the delectable sushi itself. Viewers will be tempted to hop the next flight to Tokyo, but probably will have to settle for a Japanese eatery closer to home.

New York Daily News

New York Daily News

press

An extraordinary morsel of a movie, and yes, you'll want sushi afterward. But it won't taste like Jiro's.

3.0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

Even if you don't fancy raw fish, "Jiro" is a captivating film.

A.V. Club

A.V. Club

press

Even at a brief 81 minutes, Jiro Dreams Of Sushi runs a little longer than it needs to, given that it’s making the same point over and over: that it takes uncommon dedication to repeat the same steps every day for decades, always looking for ways to make the process better, not easier.

ANOTHER COOKING FILM

But worth a watch.

3.0

Must-watch for foodies and workaholics alike

Anyone who considers themselves a foodie or appreciates a fine work ethic will definitely enjoy this film. It paints a complete picture of what's involved in creating some of the best sushi you could have in the world, from sourcing only the best seafood at specialist vendors at the famous Tsujiki Market, to demonstrating how an octopus is massaged for 50...

5.0

Eat before you go...

Quite a facinating tale of a very focussed (read: obssessive) man and how he creates the world's best sushi. The fact that his restaurant is tiny, sushi chefs all over Tokyo try to emulate him, and his esteem in the community all tell of a man dedicated to his art. Well worth a watch, but make sure you eat before you go.

4.0