Jungle Fever

Jungle Fever

Jungle Fever

Spike Lee's 1991 romance drama follows a married black man and successful architect who causes a stir with friends and family when he enters a relationship with a white secretary from work.

1991Rating: R16, Offensive language132 minsUSA
DramaRomance

Jungle Fever / Reviews

TV Guide

TV Guide

JUNGLE FEVER offers a host of well-acted, thought-provoking dramatic situations, wrapped in one mess of a story.

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Time Out

Time Out

Lee's 'joint' looks good, features a chorus of garrulous characters (most of them heavily into racial hatred), makes stirring use of music (by Stevie Wonder and others), and never allows the forgiving women a fair share of the deal.

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The Washington Post

The Washington Post

The most obvious problem occurs between Snipes and Sciorra. Lee's so interested in the ripple effect they cause, he almost forgets the affair itself. We see anger all over Harlem and Bensonhurst, but we're barely allowed into the main bedroom, where the real hell must be taking place.

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Variety

Variety

Performances are all pointed and emotionally edgy. Film feels too long, but it ends powerfully, as the audience exits with the view that both the white and black communities are deeply troubled and have a very long way to go to resolve their differences.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Not quite the classic that Spike Lee had been threatening to make for so long, but, after a return to form after Mo' Better Blues which proved a huge disappointment.

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Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

"Jungle Fever" contains two sequences - the girl talk and the crackhouse visit - of amazing power. It contains humor and insight and canny psychology, strong performances, and the fearless discussion of things both races would rather not face.

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