Marjorie Prime

Marjorie Prime

Marjorie Prime

Jon Hamm is an holographic projection of an ailing widow's (Lois Smith) late husband in Michael Almereyda's (Experimenter) adaptation of Jordan Harrison's play. Co-stars Tim Robbins.

"Eighty-six-year-old Marjorie (Smith) spends her final, ailing days with a computerised version of her deceased husband. With the intent to recount their life together, Marjorie’s “Prime” relies on the information from her and her kin to develop a more complex understanding of his history. As their interactions deepen, the family begins to develop ever diverging recounts of their lives, drawn into the chance to reconstruct the often painful past." (Sundance Film Festival)

Winner of the Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film Prize, 2017 Sundance Film Festival
2017Rating: M, Suicide references98 minsUSA
ComedyDramaMysteryScience Fiction

Streaming (2 Providers)

Marjorie Prime / Reviews

Chicago Reader

Chicago Reader

Michael Almereyda (Experimenter) directed, honouring the play's quiet solemnity and carefully crafted dialogue.

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Financial Times

Financial Times

There is a clever idea here... But the cleverness becomes chatterboxed to death.

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Little White Lies

Little White Lies

An elegant, absorbing and stimulating experience.

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The New Yorker

The New Yorker

Michael Almereyda’s film is so subtly smart, and veiled in such layers of suggestion, that you need to be on your toes from the beginning.

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The Washington Post

The Washington Post

As a sly chamber piece, it reassures and unsettles in equal, exquisitely calibrated measure.

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Vulture

Vulture

Marjorie Prime is exquisite - beautiful, intense, shivering with empathy.

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New York Daily News

New York Daily News

Like the play by Jordan Harrison it's based on, writer-director Michael Almereyda's film is small in scale, but pulls us in close with its provocative setup.

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San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle

Hamm perfectly plays Walter as a sort of suave, GQ version of HAL 9000, and Davis and Robbins have their most satisfying feature film roles in years.

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Village Voice

Village Voice

Leave it to Michael Almereyda to make a science fiction movie that consists of little more than scenes of two characters talking in plushly appointed living rooms.

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A.V. Club

A.V. Club

The movie lacks ostentation; it appears so simple and unworldly and unhip that one wants to protect it.

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Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair

Marjorie Prime is very much a chamber piece with flashes of cinematic brilliance.

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

A seamless, unshowy weave of chamber piece and speculative fiction...

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The New York Times

The New York Times

There's more going on in this movie's 90-plus minutes than in many summer blockbusters nearly twice its length.

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Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal

Much of the fun of Marjorie Prime is in figuring out where it's going, and why.

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Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly

Marjorie Prime in itself feels not unlike Walter’s hologram - almost real and almost human, but not quite flesh and blood.

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Time Out

Time Out

Though visually spare and undistinguished, the movie gets revelatory mileage out of Geena Davis...

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IndieWire

IndieWire

Marjorie Prime feels less true at every turn.

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Variety

Variety

One leaves "Marjorie Prime" pleased to have witnessed these actors at work, and rather wishing you'd got to see them tackle this intimate piece in a warmer, flesh-and-blood theatrical context.

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Screen Daily

Screen Daily

Marjorie Prime is both a sophisticated chamber drama and a captivating contemplation of time, memory and mortality.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

This is the rare recent stage-to-screen adaptation that actually improves on the source.

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