Mrs. Ratcliffe's Revolution

Mrs. Ratcliffe's Revolution

Mrs. Ratcliffe's Revolution
Based on a true story, this is the madcap adventure of a dysfunctional family from Bingley in Yorkshire who defect to East Germany in 1968. The father, Frank Ratcliffe (Iain Glen), is a teacher and the leader of Bingley’s communist party, and feels that his family would benefit from some time in what he imagines to be a Marxist utopia. When they get there, however, things are not as rosy as they had expected.

Frank’s family includes seventeen-year-old Alex, cool and sexy; eleven-year-old Mary, Bingley’s youngest communist; and his wife Dorothy (Catherine Tate), a typical British housewife. The adventure begins when Dorothy befriends a boy called Otto, and helps him escape to the West.
2008Rating: M, Low level offensive language102 minsUK
ComedyTrue Story & Biography
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Reviews & comments

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Inept British comedy.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

If you’re looking for a film about life in Communist East Germany, go rent The Lives Of Others. But this is still one of the better British comedies we’ve seen this year, and worthy of the inevitable comparisons to Good Bye Lenin!

3.0
0
Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

Co-writers Bridget O'Connor and Peter Straughan mine the rich vein of humour in the fish-out-of-water premise but struggle to come up with anything truly startling (the slapstick humour consists mostly of slaps).

3.0
0
BBC

BBC

press

As the titular housewife in Mrs Ratcliffe's Revolution, comedienne Catherine Tate bears the weight of the world on her shoulders. Given that it's her first major leading role, she plays it up convincingly for this refreshing comedy drama (supposedly true) that sees the meek Mrs Dorothy Ratcliffe transform into a floral-clad freedom fighter under the oppressive East German regime in the 60s. Although the plot frays slightly at the edges, it all comes together eventually.

3.0
0

Mildly entertaining but hardly memorable.

telling a story about the days before the tearing down of the Berlin Wall, supposedly based on fact needs to be done better, although Mrs. Ratcliffe probably did provide a little reminder of life under such regimes. Even if a bit spoofishly.

3.0
0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Inept British comedy.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

If you’re looking for a film about life in Communist East Germany, go rent The Lives Of Others. But this is still one of the better British comedies we’ve seen this year, and worthy of the inevitable comparisons to Good Bye Lenin!

3.0
0
Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

Co-writers Bridget O'Connor and Peter Straughan mine the rich vein of humour in the fish-out-of-water premise but struggle to come up with anything truly startling (the slapstick humour consists mostly of slaps).

3.0
0
BBC

BBC

press

As the titular housewife in Mrs Ratcliffe's Revolution, comedienne Catherine Tate bears the weight of the world on her shoulders. Given that it's her first major leading role, she plays it up convincingly for this refreshing comedy drama (supposedly true) that sees the meek Mrs Dorothy Ratcliffe transform into a floral-clad freedom fighter under the oppressive East German regime in the 60s. Although the plot frays slightly at the edges, it all comes together eventually.

3.0
0

Mildly entertaining but hardly memorable.

telling a story about the days before the tearing down of the Berlin Wall, supposedly based on fact needs to be done better, although Mrs. Ratcliffe probably did provide a little reminder of life under such regimes. Even if a bit spoofishly.

3.0
0