Song for Marion

Song for Marion

Song for Marion

Set in London, this geriatric comedy drama stars Terence Stamp as a shy, grumpy pensioner who is reluctantly inspired by his beloved wife (Vanessa Redgrave) to join a highly unconventional local choir led by Gemma Arterton.

At odds with his son James (Christopher Eccleston), it is up to Elizabeth (Arterton) to try and persuade Arthur (Stamp) that he can learn to embrace life, using music as a way to battle his grumbling persona.

2012Rating: PG, Coarse language and sexual references93 minsUK
ComedyDramaMusicRomance

Streaming (2 Providers)

Song for Marion / Reviews

Flicks, Rebecca Barry Hill

Flicks, Rebecca Barry Hill

Retire to another cinema if you don’t fancy giving your tear ducts a work-out. That’s what Terence Stamp’s curmudgeonly Arthur would do in Song For Marion, a film striving to match the success of Quartet, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel and, by virtue of its esteemed older cast, The King’s Speech. Even those who find the story’s central choir, the OAPz, (Old-Age Pensioners) cloying will find it hard not to suppress the waterworks. This is one film that’s equal parts moving and grating.

Full review
Variety

Variety

A sentimental tearjerker targeted at the over-50s who made "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" a box office hit.

Full review
Total Film

Total Film

There may be the odd bum note but Williams' film is largely on song and full of genuine, heartfelt emotion. Stamp's masterclass in melancholy is something to behold.

Full review
Time Out

Time Out

Even though we know where the film's going, it still manages to give the tear-ducts a workout.

Full review
The Guardian

The Guardian

Grit-meister Paul Andrew Williams switches to the key of C major for a commercial crowdpleaser about a seniors' choir.

Full review
Little White Lies

Little White Lies

Too emotionally manipulative, but not without its moments of real tenderness and warmth.

Full review
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Redgrave and Stamp have a touching, mismatched chemistry, and in their hands the marriage described in Williams's script feels lived-in and real.

Full review
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

With Redgrave on top form and the story's moving take on devotion in the face of death, your tear ducts will be powerless to resist.

Full review