Sorry We Missed You

Sorry We Missed You

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Sorry We Missed You

Palme d'Or nominee sees director Ken Loach reteam with the screenwriter of I, Daniel Blake for this story of a modern-day English family struggling to get past looming debt brought on by the 2008 financial crash.

"Ricky (Kris Hitchen) is a former construction worker who lost his job and home in the 2008 financial crash. Eager to make a go at being his own boss, he takes a quasi-freelance delivery gig, though it means punishing hours, working under a ruthless manager, and making a substantial investment up front. Ricky convinces his wife, Abbie (Debbie Honeywood), a home-care nurse, to sell her car in order to buy the van he needs for the job. Complications mount as Ricky starts to discover the harsh realities of supposedly autonomous labour, his son Seb (Rhys Stone) courts trouble in his new-found, semi-politicized vocation as a graffiti artist, and the family's hopes of getting ahead seem only to drag them further behind." (Toronto International Film Festival)

2019Rating: M, Violence & offensive language101 minsBelgium, France, UK
Drama
Director:
Ken Loach ('I, Daniel Blake', 'The Wind that Shakes the Barley', 'The Angels' Share')
Writer:
Paul Laverty
Cast:
Kris HitchenDebbie HoneywoodRhys StoneKatie ProctorRoss BrewsterCharlie RichmondJulian IonsSheila Dunkerley
83%
want to see

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Reviews & comments

New Zealand Listener

New Zealand Listener

press

Loach’s sense of realism is not fiction masquerading as documentary. Rather, it’s a tool to heighten and underline the withering of his characters. Loach is by now such an expert portrayer of hard-scrabble communities that any whiff of manipulation sinks into the background. What remains is the grit of authenticity, and the rage of injustice.

0
Total Film

Total Film

press

Another powerful rallying cry for the oppressed from one of British cinema's most important voices.

4.0
0
Stuff

Stuff

press

Gritty and raw, only the hardest of hearts won't feel for the Turners and the plight as they try to balance securing their financial future with keeping their family intact.

4.0
0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

Sorry We Missed You is Loach at his most angry and topical, tackling the "gig economy" of the 2010s much as he and his regular writer Paul Laverty took on Britain's unemployment benefit system in 2016's I, Daniel Blake.

0
Variety

Variety

press

Another intimate and powerful drama about what’s going on in people’s everyday lives. ... Loach stages all of this with supreme confidence and flow.

0
Time Out

Time Out

press

What’s different is the detail with which Loach and his collaborators examine the effects of work and society on the nuclear family.

4.0
0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

It’s fierce, open and angry, unironised and unadorned, about a vital contemporary issue whose implications you somehow don’t hear on the news.

5.0
0
IndieWire

IndieWire

press

“Sorry to Miss You” doesn’t break new ground for the filmmaker, but it radiates a timeliness that suggests an old-fashioned Ken Loach lament matters more than ever.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

A drama of such searing human empathy and quotidian heartbreak that its powerful climactic scenes actually impede your breathing.

0
New Zealand Listener

New Zealand Listener

press

Loach’s sense of realism is not fiction masquerading as documentary. Rather, it’s a tool to heighten and underline the withering of his characters. Loach is by now such an expert portrayer of hard-scrabble communities that any whiff of manipulation sinks into the background. What remains is the grit of authenticity, and the rage of injustice.

0
Total Film

Total Film

press

Another powerful rallying cry for the oppressed from one of British cinema's most important voices.

4.0
0
Stuff

Stuff

press

Gritty and raw, only the hardest of hearts won't feel for the Turners and the plight as they try to balance securing their financial future with keeping their family intact.

4.0
0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

Sorry We Missed You is Loach at his most angry and topical, tackling the "gig economy" of the 2010s much as he and his regular writer Paul Laverty took on Britain's unemployment benefit system in 2016's I, Daniel Blake.

0
Variety

Variety

press

Another intimate and powerful drama about what’s going on in people’s everyday lives. ... Loach stages all of this with supreme confidence and flow.

0
Time Out

Time Out

press

What’s different is the detail with which Loach and his collaborators examine the effects of work and society on the nuclear family.

4.0
0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

It’s fierce, open and angry, unironised and unadorned, about a vital contemporary issue whose implications you somehow don’t hear on the news.

5.0
0
IndieWire

IndieWire

press

“Sorry to Miss You” doesn’t break new ground for the filmmaker, but it radiates a timeliness that suggests an old-fashioned Ken Loach lament matters more than ever.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

A drama of such searing human empathy and quotidian heartbreak that its powerful climactic scenes actually impede your breathing.

0