Sputnik

Sputnik

Sputnik

A Russian psychologist examines the sole survivor of a crashed Soviet spacecraft in this Cold War horror. On closer inspection, it appears the commander's been infected by an unknown parasite, and it's growing...

2020Rating: R16, Violence & horror113 minsRussiaRussian with English subtitles
HorrorScience FictionWorld Cinema

FIND TIMES & TICKETS

Reviews & comments

Film Threat

Film Threat

press

Abramenko, for the most part, relies on character development rather than action and effects to drive the story, proving as adept at helming quieter moments as he is at handling louder sequences.

Variety

Variety

press

Abramenko maintains the film's finite appeal throughout, mostly thanks to a familiar aura and a charismatic lead performance by Oksana Akinshina, a fine surrogate for the tough-as-nails heroine Ellen Ripley.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Duller than it sounds.

Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair

press

This is altogether well-made, straightforward entertainment, gross but contained, intriguingly structured: a movie as slickly designed as the slime trailing the alien's mermaid butt.

Vulture

Vulture

press

Sputnik's genre pleasures are modest, but like the best sci-fi, it gets you thinking.

Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

In a concrete Russian military facility, no-one can hear you scream. Sputnik offers obvious time-honoured sci-fi/horror shenanigans with a few fun tweaks to the formula.

3.0
IndieWire

IndieWire

press

"Sputnik" is a reminder of the mixed-bag experience that so many of them offer: It's an efficient, effects-driven ride with snippets of real ideas, but never quite willing to take them out of this world.

Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine

press

Sputnik’s third act is a rush of formulaic action meant, perhaps, to compensate for the interminably repetitive and impersonal second act, which is mostly concerned with reinforcing a set of foregone conclusions.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

You’ve seen this before. Think of it as a potent dose of sci-fi/horror Methadone to keep the withdrawals at bay.

3.0
RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

press

The creature design, by the director in collaboration with Main Road Post, is a masterstroke: staring at this thing, which looks horrifying from some angles and almost cute from others, you keep thinking you can see intelligence or motivation in that wet, many-eyed face, but then you decide it’s just your imagination—that you’re just projecting onto it.

Film Threat

Film Threat

press

Abramenko, for the most part, relies on character development rather than action and effects to drive the story, proving as adept at helming quieter moments as he is at handling louder sequences.

Variety

Variety

press

Abramenko maintains the film's finite appeal throughout, mostly thanks to a familiar aura and a charismatic lead performance by Oksana Akinshina, a fine surrogate for the tough-as-nails heroine Ellen Ripley.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Duller than it sounds.

Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair

press

This is altogether well-made, straightforward entertainment, gross but contained, intriguingly structured: a movie as slickly designed as the slime trailing the alien's mermaid butt.

Vulture

Vulture

press

Sputnik's genre pleasures are modest, but like the best sci-fi, it gets you thinking.

Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

In a concrete Russian military facility, no-one can hear you scream. Sputnik offers obvious time-honoured sci-fi/horror shenanigans with a few fun tweaks to the formula.

3.0
IndieWire

IndieWire

press

"Sputnik" is a reminder of the mixed-bag experience that so many of them offer: It's an efficient, effects-driven ride with snippets of real ideas, but never quite willing to take them out of this world.

Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine

press

Sputnik’s third act is a rush of formulaic action meant, perhaps, to compensate for the interminably repetitive and impersonal second act, which is mostly concerned with reinforcing a set of foregone conclusions.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

You’ve seen this before. Think of it as a potent dose of sci-fi/horror Methadone to keep the withdrawals at bay.

3.0
RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

press

The creature design, by the director in collaboration with Main Road Post, is a masterstroke: staring at this thing, which looks horrifying from some angles and almost cute from others, you keep thinking you can see intelligence or motivation in that wet, many-eyed face, but then you decide it’s just your imagination—that you’re just projecting onto it.

There aren't any user reviews for this movie yet.