The Age of Stupid

The Age of Stupid

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The Age of Stupid

Documentary-drama with Pete Postlethwaite as a man living alone in the devastated future world of 2055, looking at old footage from 2008 and asking: why didn’t we stop climate change when we had the chance?

Covering the topics "climate change, oil, war, politics, consumerism and human stupidity", The Age of Stupid was shot on location in America, UK, India, Nigeria, Iraq, Jordan and the Swiss Alps over a period of three years. It features six separate documentary stories, archive footage and animation (from, amongst others, the creators of the Gorillaz animations). Soundtrack includes songs from Radiohead and Depeche Mode.

2009Rating: M, contains offensive language92 minsUK
DocumentaryDrama
50%
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Reviews & comments

The New York Times

The New York Times

press

A thread of needling gallows humor runs through “The Age of Stupid.” Near the end of the film the Archivist wonders: “Why didn’t we save ourselves? Was the answer that we weren’t sure we were worth saving?” He may have a point.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Like other activist documentaries, may face putdowns from those who find it insufficiently sophisticated or consensual. But it deserves a hearing. To mangle a well-known phrase: Rome is burning and Franny Armstrong is fiddling the right tune.

0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

There is no denying the passion of director Armstrong, whose McLibel documented the David-and-Goliath struggle between fast-food giant McDonald's and environmental activists Dave Marsh and Helen Steel. But the film loses focus at times, in particular in its concentration on small domestic action.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Although interesting in its content, this could have worked better as a straight documentary.

3.0
0

This should be compulsory viewing for anyone with a genuine interest in the future of this planet.

5.0
0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

A thread of needling gallows humor runs through “The Age of Stupid.” Near the end of the film the Archivist wonders: “Why didn’t we save ourselves? Was the answer that we weren’t sure we were worth saving?” He may have a point.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Like other activist documentaries, may face putdowns from those who find it insufficiently sophisticated or consensual. But it deserves a hearing. To mangle a well-known phrase: Rome is burning and Franny Armstrong is fiddling the right tune.

0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

There is no denying the passion of director Armstrong, whose McLibel documented the David-and-Goliath struggle between fast-food giant McDonald's and environmental activists Dave Marsh and Helen Steel. But the film loses focus at times, in particular in its concentration on small domestic action.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Although interesting in its content, this could have worked better as a straight documentary.

3.0
0

This should be compulsory viewing for anyone with a genuine interest in the future of this planet.

5.0
0