The Future

The Future

The Future

Performance artist, writer and director Miranda July's follow up to 2005's Me, You and Everyone We Know, following a couple in the grips of a pre-mid-life crisis, their impending adoption of a cat, and the time/space continuum.

"Sophie (July) and Jason (Hamish Linklater) live in a small Los Angeles apartment, have jobs they hate, and in one month they’ll adopt a stray cat named Paw Paw. Like a newborn baby, he’ll need around-the-clock care – he may die in six months, or it may take five years. Sophie and Jason are terrified of their looming loss of freedom. So with one month left, they quit their jobs, and the internet, to pursue their dreams – Sophie wants to create a dance, Jason wants simply to be guided by fate... Living in two terrifyingly vacant and different realities, Sophie and Jason must reunite with time, space and their own souls in order to come home." (Official Synopsis)

2011
Drama

The Future / Reviews

Variety

Variety

For all the superficial hilarity of July's approach, a much sadder streak runs deep through the entire film, reinforced by Jon Brion's score (more tones than melody).

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Total Film

Total Film

Winningly weird or suffocated by whimsy? Magical or morose? July’s romantic fantasy of stagnation and romantic drift has depths, but they’re hidden behind walls of kookiness. The Future... is uncertain.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

The magical, metaphorical strain in The Future is what makes it powerful, unsettling and strange, as well as charming.

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Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

On the surface, this film is an enchanting meditation. At its core is the hard steel of individuality.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

July's second film, while not quite as perfectly realised as her debut, nimbly avoids the 'sophomore slump', providing the curious with another window into her highly idiosyncratic world.

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A.V. Club

A.V. Club

July and Linklater turn their ineptitude into a funny running joke, which becomes surprisingly affecting in the second half.

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