The Last Sentence

The Last Sentence

The Last Sentence

Based on the life of Swedish journalist Torgny Segerstedt, this black and white biopic follows Segerstedt's one-man battle against Hitler, the Nazi regime and his own country's neutrality. Officially neutral but fearing German reprisal, Sweden's leaders did their best to silence the writer, especially as he began attracting the ire of top Nazi officials.

2012Rating: M, Adult themes120 minsSweden, NorwaySwedish with English subtitles
BiographyDramaTrue Story & BiographyRomanceWarWorld Cinema
Director:
Jan Troell ('The Emigrants', 'Everlasting Moments')
Cast:
Jesper ChristensenPernilla August

Reviews & comments

Flicks, Aaron Yap

Flicks, Aaron Yap

flicks

Veteran Swedish director Jan Troell’s biopic of his fellow countryman, Torgny Segerstedt (Jesper Christensen) - a newspaper editor in the ‘30s who spoke out against Adolf Hitler - is an exceedingly sombre, lugubriously paced historical drama that stirs the intellect more than the heart. Which is a little odd, since Klaus Rifbjerg’s screenplay - based on Kenne Fant’s biography - foregrounds the personal aspects of Togrny’s life, focusing on his relationship with three women: Norwegian wife Puste (Ulla Skoog), who’s trapped in a loveless marriage; Jewish mistress Maja (Pernilla August), who’s married to his publisher boss; and his dead mother, who haunts him as a black-veiled apparition.

3.0
Variety

Variety

press

Offers a potentially intriguing study in high-minded political/moral obstinacy, but feels too claustrophobic — and, finally, tediously like a one-man window on great events — to fully come to dramatic life.

Flicks, Aaron Yap

Flicks, Aaron Yap

flicks

Veteran Swedish director Jan Troell’s biopic of his fellow countryman, Torgny Segerstedt (Jesper Christensen) - a newspaper editor in the ‘30s who spoke out against Adolf Hitler - is an exceedingly sombre, lugubriously paced historical drama that stirs the intellect more than the heart. Which is a little odd, since Klaus Rifbjerg’s screenplay - based on Kenne Fant’s biography - foregrounds the personal aspects of Togrny’s life, focusing on his relationship with three women: Norwegian wife Puste (Ulla Skoog), who’s trapped in a loveless marriage; Jewish mistress Maja (Pernilla August), who’s married to his publisher boss; and his dead mother, who haunts him as a black-veiled apparition.

3.0
Variety

Variety

press

Offers a potentially intriguing study in high-minded political/moral obstinacy, but feels too claustrophobic — and, finally, tediously like a one-man window on great events — to fully come to dramatic life.

There aren't any user reviews for this movie yet.