The Lobster

The Lobster

STREAMING NOW2 Providers
The Lobster

Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz star in this dystopian romantic comedy from director Yorgos Lanthimos (Dogtooth). Set in a near future with strict rules about finding a partner, single people are taken to The Hotel, where they have 45 days to find a partner - otherwise they are transformed into an animal and sent into the woods. Winner of the Jury Prize, Queer Palm and Palm Dog at Cannes Film Festival 2015. John C. Reilly, Léa Seydoux, Ben Whishaw and Olivia Colman co-star.

Jury Prize, Queer Palm and Palm Dog at Cannes Film Festival 2015
2015Rating: R16, content that may disturb, offensive language, sex scenes, violence118 minsIreland, UK, Greece, France, NetherlandsEnglish and French with English subtitles
ComedyScience FictionRomanceFestival & Independent
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Reviews & comments

Variety

Variety

press

Wickedly funny, unexpectedly moving satire of couple-fixated society.

0
Time Out

Time Out

press

This is cinema in quotemarks, tongue-in-cheek storytelling that uses absurdity to hold a mirror to how we live and love.

3.0
0
The Telegraph

The Telegraph

press

Like nothing you've seen before.

4.0
0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Enjoyably strange but fails to follow through on its premise.

3.0
0
Little White Lies

Little White Lies

press

Appreciation for the sheer conceptual confidence of the film gathers momentum once you think back over it.

4.0
0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

A richly rewarding but often very disturbing, even harrowing work.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Inordinately strange and tiresomely glum, but in spots hideously funny.

3.0
0

To appreciate a film like The Lobster (2015) you need to know something about absurdism and dystopia. Whether we recognise it or not, our brains are wired into binary sets that help us make sense of the world. For example: in fictional narrative we tell stories about being unloved in order to express our need for love; we portray the fearful ‘them’ in order...

4.0
0

Extremely boring arty farty, avoid at all cost.

1.0
0

The joke is stretched probably too far in The Lobster, could've been shorter. But nonetheless a funny and wry comedy, with a great ending.

3.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

Wickedly funny, unexpectedly moving satire of couple-fixated society.

0
Time Out

Time Out

press

This is cinema in quotemarks, tongue-in-cheek storytelling that uses absurdity to hold a mirror to how we live and love.

3.0
0
The Telegraph

The Telegraph

press

Like nothing you've seen before.

4.0
0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Enjoyably strange but fails to follow through on its premise.

3.0
0
Little White Lies

Little White Lies

press

Appreciation for the sheer conceptual confidence of the film gathers momentum once you think back over it.

4.0
0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

A richly rewarding but often very disturbing, even harrowing work.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Inordinately strange and tiresomely glum, but in spots hideously funny.

3.0
0

To appreciate a film like The Lobster (2015) you need to know something about absurdism and dystopia. Whether we recognise it or not, our brains are wired into binary sets that help us make sense of the world. For example: in fictional narrative we tell stories about being unloved in order to express our need for love; we portray the fearful ‘them’ in...

4.0
0

Extremely boring arty farty, avoid at all cost.

1.0
0

The joke is stretched probably too far in The Lobster, could've been shorter. But nonetheless a funny and wry comedy, with a great ending.

3.0
0