The Purge: Election Year

The Purge: Election Year

The Purge: Election Year

After making it out of The Purge: Anarchy alive, Frank Grillo returns for this third installment in the franchise that makes murder legal for one night. This time, a senator is looking to abolish the purge, only to end up lost in the middle of it...

It’s been two years since Leo Barnes (Grillo) stopped himself from a regrettable act of revenge on Purge Night. Now serving as head of security for Senator Charlie Roan (Elizabeth Mitchell, Lost), his mission is to protect her in a run for President and survive the annual ritual that targets the poor and innocent. But when a betrayal forces them onto the streets of D.C. on the one night when no help is available, they must stay alive until dawn…or both be sacrificed for their sins against the state.

2016Rating: R16, Violence and offensive language109 minsUSA, France
ActionHorrorThriller
Director:
James DeMonaco ('The Purge: Anarchy', 'The Purge')
Writer:
James DeMonaco
Cast:
Frank GrilloElizabeth Mitchell

Streaming (3 Providers)

The Purge: Election Year / Reviews

Variety

Variety

You’d think the concept would now be wearing thin, but Election Year, which feels like the final chapter in a trilogy...is the best “Purge” film yet.

Full review
Time Out

Time Out

[DeMonaco's] vision of an America where the citizens are encouraged to express their basest emotions is more relevant than ever.

Full review
Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

You can be a pissed-off Tea Partier or an Occupy advocate and find something here to stoke your fat cat hatred...

Full review
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

More complex action sequences and well-focused set pieces that are both efficiently executed and visually engaging.

Full review
Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly

Writer-director James DeMonaco’s third chapter in the thrill-kill vigilante franchise is the best and pulpiest Purge yet.

Full review
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Maintains the nervy tension that made the first films entertaining, but doubles down on the political metaphors, overwhelming you with its soap-box rhetoric.

Full review

The Purge: Election Year / Trailers