Twice Upon A Time

Twice Upon A Time

Twice Upon A Time

Film director Louis Ruinard (Rochefort) and his favourite actress Alice d’Abanville (Rampling) were one of the most flamboyant star couples of the seventies. But their love affair came to an abrupt end when Alice disappeared from Louis’ life one day without explanation. She returned to her native England, rapidly married a young lord with whom she had a son, and put an end to her film career. Thirty years on, when Louis arrives in London to make his thirty-fourth film, the organisers of the BAFTAs decide to honour him with a Lifetime Achievement award. Naturally, they invite Alice to present it to him. So the two monstrously proud and talented people - who passed each other by (and never got over it) - dive into an icy re-union.

2007Rating: M, contains sex scenes & offensive language91 minsFrance, UK, RomaniaEnglish & French with English subtitles
Comedy

Reviews & comments

Don't bother

A promising cast (apart from the son, who is dreadful) is let down by a poor script. The few jokes are predictable. Light entertainment at best.

2.0
Sunday Star-Times

Sunday Star-Times

press

Director Antoine de Caunes mishandles key scenes, confusing us and blunting the humour. Some feel awkward and cliched, such as when the two meet after many years for tea: (Stuffy maitre d': "No tie, no tea, sir." Cue discomfort in mismatched attire.) The awards night is another, a moment not improved by there seeming to be a dozen people at the theatre...

Stuff

Stuff

press

It is wonderful cinema, light enough not to give viewers emotional indigestion, but as nourishing and rewarding as anyone could want. Not to be missed...

Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

A rare mature romantic comedy, Twice overcomes its creaky, deja vu plot thanks to the sparks created by its two leads...

3.0
Sunday Star-Times

Sunday Star-Times

press

Director Antoine de Caunes mishandles key scenes, confusing us and blunting the humour. Some feel awkward and cliched, such as when the two meet after many years for tea: (Stuffy maitre d': "No tie, no tea, sir." Cue discomfort in mismatched attire.) The awards night is another, a moment not improved by there seeming to be a dozen people at the theatre...

Stuff

Stuff

press

It is wonderful cinema, light enough not to give viewers emotional indigestion, but as nourishing and rewarding as anyone could want. Not to be missed...

Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

A rare mature romantic comedy, Twice overcomes its creaky, deja vu plot thanks to the sparks created by its two leads...

3.0

Don't bother

A promising cast (apart from the son, who is dreadful) is let down by a poor script. The few jokes are predictable. Light entertainment at best.

2.0