White Bird in a Blizzard

White Bird in a Blizzard

White Bird in a Blizzard

Set in the late ‘80s, the life of a teenage girl (Shailene Woodley, The Fault in Our Stars) gets complicated in this coming-of-age mystery after the seemingly random disappearance of her mother (Eva Green, 300: Rise of an Empire).

Kat (Woodley) is 17 years old when her perfect homemaker mother, Eve (Green), an enigmatic and haunted woman, disappears. Having lived in a stifled, emotionally repressed household, she barely registers her mother's absence and certainly doesn't blame her doormat of a father (Christopher Meloni) for the loss. But as time passes, Kat begins to come to grips with how deeply Eve's disappearance has affected her. Returning home on a break from college, she finds herself confronted with the truth about her mother's departure, and her own denial about the events surrounding it.

2014Rating: R16, Sex scenes,violence,drug use and offensive language88 minsUSA, France
DramaMysteryThriller
Director:
Gregg Araki ('Kaboom', 'Mysterious Skin', 'The Doom Generation')
Writer:
Gregg Araki
Cast:
Shailene WoodleyEva GreenChristopher MeloniShiloh FernandezAngela BassettThomas Jane

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White Bird in a Blizzard / Reviews

Variety

Variety

It's easy to be distracted by (and possibly even to dismiss) "White Bird" as a tarted-up Nancy Drew mystery without recognizing it's a complex take on how teens must break away from their parents to become their own person.

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Total Film

Total Film

Misses the energy and vitality of Gregg Araki's best work, but there's more going on here than immediately meets the eye.

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Time Out

Time Out

Araki has never made a boring movie, even if his brand of too-fast-too-soon sexual awakening has become something of a crutch.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

Its elements don't really cohere.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

This dreamy/nightmarish weirdie finds Araki reining in his anarchic excesses with rewarding results, as his satirical sensuality reaps the benefits of a heavily orchestrated deadpan formality.

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Araki's campy-clunky, crass-for-crass'-sake adaptation of the 1999 novel by Laura Kasischke needed a full rethink.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

A more restrained effort from Araki than the headrush of Kaboom, there's plenty of fun to be had in Eva Green's Joan Crawford-esque turn as the vanished lady.

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