Tehran: Season 1

Tehran: Season 1

Tehran: Season 1

A computer-hacking Mossad agent embarks on one hell of a first mission in her home town of Tehran - disabling a nuclear reactor - in this eight-part series. When the mission fails, she goes rogue, leading to a rediscovery of her Iranian roots and an entanglement with a pro-democracy activist while contending with Iranian authorities.

2020IsraelApple
ThrillerWorld Cinema

Streaming (1 Provider)

EPISODE 1.1
25 September 2020

Emergency Landing in Tehran

Tamar Rabinyan, a gifted hacker and a Mossad agent, enters the heart of Tehran to neutralize army radar systems and enable Israel’s air force to bomb Iran’s nuclear reactor.

EPISODE 1.2
25 September 2020

Blood on Her Hands

Tabrizi, a local Mossad agent, tries to help Tamar in any way possible, while Revolutionary Guard officer Faraz is hot on Tamar's trail.

EPISODE 1.3
25 September 2020

Yasamin's Girl

Hiding with her aunt, Tamar goes underground and attempts to escape Iran. Faraz and Tabrizi broaden their searches for her.

EPISODE 1.4
2 October 2020

Shakira and Sickboy

When she finds a commune of young regime opponents, Tamar takes refuge with them—and becomes close with Milad.

EPISODE 1.5
9 October 2020

The Other Iran

At an underground rave with Milad and the other commune members, Tamar must prove her loyalty. Faraz and Tabrizi reach a boiling point.

EPISODE 1.6
16 October 2020

The Engineer

Tamar and Milad return to Tehran and blackmail their electric company contact. Kadosh tries to convince Gorev to approve Tamar’s new plan.

EPISODE 1.7
23 October 2020

Tamar's Father

The incident at the commune leaves Tamar shattered. Kadosh tries to help her recover so they can set the power plant operation in motion.

EPISODE 1.8
30 October 2020

Five Hours Until the Bombing Run

With Israeli planes approaching the reactor, Tamar, Milad, and Kadosh launch an operation as Faraz closes in on them. Season finale.

Tehran: Season 1 / Reviews

Variety

Variety

“Tehran” doesn’t exclude Iranians entirely, but does frame them as allies or obstacles of a Mossad mission depicted uncritically and somewhat blankly as the work of justice, and more than that as a vehicle for thrills and scares.

Full review
A.V. Club

A.V. Club

The dialogue is primarily in Hebrew and Persian languages, but to paraphrase one of Bong Joon-ho’s speeches during his Oscar win, overcoming the one-inch tall barrier of subtitles leads one to a lot more valuable art. Tehran is a solid example of that.

Full review
The Telegraph

The Telegraph

Strip away the subtitles and the beautiful yet subtlety alien Middle East vistas and what’s left is essentially a gender-swapped Bourne Identity. But Zonder orchestras the tension masterfully, crafting a thriller as stylish as it is heart-stopping.

Full review
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Though it’s set in two countries, alternates between English, Hebrew and Farsi and boasts a sprawling cast, Tehran is so immersive and narratively orderly that it’s almost impossible to get lost.

Full review
Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal

Improbable though it is as a spy story, Tehran maintains its suspense throughout, possibly because it's about more than spying. It's a tale that incorporates the drama of lost cultures and identities

Full review