Breakfast at Tiffany's

Breakfast at Tiffany's

Breakfast at Tiffany's

Perhaps the greatest of all romantic-comedies, 1961's Breakfast at Tiffany's is based on the bestselling novella by Truman Capote, winner of two Academy Awards (for Original Score and Original Song) and stars two perfect leads.

Stunning Audrey Hepburn plays Holly Golightly (in a role Capote intended for Marilyn Munroe), a seemingly innocent Manhattan call-girl who lives a dizzying, unstructured and mischievous lifestyle, constantly in search of a millionaire to marry. She falls for her neighbour Paul (George Peppard at his best), a struggling writer 'sponsored' by a generous lady patron who in return has romantic expectations. But Paul is fascinated and perplexed – in public Holly flits through parties with a sexy, sophisticated air (wearing Givenchy, no less), but when alone she changes into a sweetly vulnerable bundle of neuroses.

Winner of Best Original Score, Academy Awards 1962
1961Rating: PG, .115 minsUSA
ComedyRomance
Director:
Blake Edwards (the Pink Panther films, 'What Did You Do in the War, Daddy?', '10')
Writer:
George Axelrod
Cast:
Audrey HepburnGeorge PeppardPatricia NealBuddy EbsenMickey Rooney

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Breakfast at Tiffany's / Reviews

Variety

Variety

Out of the elusive, but curiously intoxicating Truman Capote fiction, scenarist George Axelrod has developed a surprisingly moving film, touched up into a stunningly visual motion picture. Capote buffs may find some of Axelrod's fanciful alterations a bit too precocious, pat and glossy for comfort, but enough of the original's charm and vigor has been retained...

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Tiffany's is actually one of the few films not to be greatly harmed by its flaws. Audrey Hepburn is delicious as Holly and the Henry Mancini score is in the class of elite soundtracks...

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BBC

BBC

Woven into this heady romance is chic Hollywood comedy at it's finest, combined with evocative cinematography. And key to allowing seamless transitions between melodrama and humour is the superb music score from the underrated Henry Mancini...

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