Bullet Boy

Bullet Boy

Bullet Boy
Gun culture goes under the microscope in low budget UK drama 'Bullet Boy'. Director Saul Dibb's documentary past shines through here, as he goes beyond sensationalist headlines to examine the chilling domestic repercussions of packing a gun. Eighteen-year-old Ricky (Walters) doesn't have to go looking for trouble; it knows where to find him. On his way home from a young offender's institute with hotheaded pal Wisdom (Black), his life collides - literally - with two rival kids from the neighbourhood. Following an unresolved stand-off, the situation spirals completely out of control - in ways that will impact upon pet dogs and the whole of Ricky's family, particularly younger brother Curtis (Fraser). [BBC]
Winner Most Promising Newcomer for Ashley Walter, British Independent Film Awards
200689 minsUK
Drama
0%
want to see?

Reviews & comments

Variety

Variety

press

Admirably terse and tense, U.K. documentarian Saul Dibb's first dramatic feature "Bullet Boy" hurtles through the 48 hours or so that grimly determine fate for a young black East Londoner just out of juvenile lockup. Screenplay by helmer and Catherine R Johnson offers almost no narrative differentiation from standard Stateside boyz-'n-the-hood violent melodramas, save (occasionally impenetrable) heavily accented local lingo. But execution is closer to hot-wired Ken Loach, with superbly convincing performances and atmosphere...

New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

The film certainly has a chillingly predictable arc - and there's something slightly glib about the upbeat ending - but it's a very accomplished debut by a film-maker who knows what suspense may be found in the mundane...

4.0
BBC

BBC

press

Gun culture goes under the microscope in Bullet Boy, Saul Dibb's powerful and moving directorial debut. Ashley Walters (aka So Solid Crew's Asher D) and newcomer Luke Fraser deliver compelling performances in this low-budget British drama, about a freshly-released jailbird who struggles to go straight on the mean streets of Hackney. On paper the clichés stack up like one of the film's high rise flats; on celluloid the movie overcomes its hackneyed plotline to deliver an all-too-believable message about the impact of firearms on a family...

4.0
Variety

Variety

press

Admirably terse and tense, U.K. documentarian Saul Dibb's first dramatic feature "Bullet Boy" hurtles through the 48 hours or so that grimly determine fate for a young black East Londoner just out of juvenile lockup. Screenplay by helmer and Catherine R Johnson offers almost no narrative differentiation from standard Stateside boyz-'n-the-hood violent melodramas, save (occasionally impenetrable) heavily accented local lingo. But execution is closer to hot-wired Ken Loach, with superbly convincing performances and atmosphere...

New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

The film certainly has a chillingly predictable arc - and there's something slightly glib about the upbeat ending - but it's a very accomplished debut by a film-maker who knows what suspense may be found in the mundane...

4.0
BBC

BBC

press

Gun culture goes under the microscope in Bullet Boy, Saul Dibb's powerful and moving directorial debut. Ashley Walters (aka So Solid Crew's Asher D) and newcomer Luke Fraser deliver compelling performances in this low-budget British drama, about a freshly-released jailbird who struggles to go straight on the mean streets of Hackney. On paper the clichés stack up like one of the film's high rise flats; on celluloid the movie overcomes its hackneyed plotline to deliver an all-too-believable message about the impact of firearms on a family...

4.0

There aren't any user reviews for this movie yet.