Death in Brunswick

Death in Brunswick

Death in Brunswick

Australian black comedy starring Sam Neill and John Clarke, based on the 1987 graphic novel by Boyd Oxlade. Carl (Neill), a reserved fella in need of a job, finds employment at a Greek restaurant. When an unexpected situation leads to the death of Mustafa, a shady coworker, Carl must figure out how to cover up. To help do so, Carl enlists the help of his buddy (Clarke).

1990109 minsAustralia
Comedy
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Reviews & comments

Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Ruane certainly has some flair, and his cast (notably Clarke as Carl's only friend) is excellent. However, this bizarre mixture of Joe Ortonesque carryings-on (clock the scene in the graveyard and the scenes - some of the best in the movie - with mother), Monty Python, fairytale and social comment is too slow, too long and too muddled to satisfy.

2.0
Urban Cinefile

Urban Cinefile

press

With its multicultural setting in suburban Melbourne, its contemporary tone and its snappy tone, Death in Brunswick is as fresh today as when it was made, with plenty of chuckles and some laugh-out-loud moments to cherish

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Takes place around the grubby band scene, Melbourne through and through. It was shot by cinematographer Ellery Ryan with a musty look that seems to seep into its dingy settings. Ryan is a cousin of Boyd Oxlade, who wrote the novel on which the film was based. The story is slow-footed but its pacing is wily and offbeat, in tune with Ruane’s playful tone-shifting direction.

Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Ruane certainly has some flair, and his cast (notably Clarke as Carl's only friend) is excellent. However, this bizarre mixture of Joe Ortonesque carryings-on (clock the scene in the graveyard and the scenes - some of the best in the movie - with mother), Monty Python, fairytale and social comment is too slow, too long and too muddled to satisfy.

2.0
Urban Cinefile

Urban Cinefile

press

With its multicultural setting in suburban Melbourne, its contemporary tone and its snappy tone, Death in Brunswick is as fresh today as when it was made, with plenty of chuckles and some laugh-out-loud moments to cherish

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Takes place around the grubby band scene, Melbourne through and through. It was shot by cinematographer Ellery Ryan with a musty look that seems to seep into its dingy settings. Ryan is a cousin of Boyd Oxlade, who wrote the novel on which the film was based. The story is slow-footed but its pacing is wily and offbeat, in tune with Ruane’s playful tone-shifting direction.

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