The Last Station

The Last Station

The Last Station

A period romance set during the last year of the life and turbulent marriage of the great Russian writer Leo Tolstoy (Christopher Plummer) and his wife the Countess Sofya (Helen Mirren).

After almost fifty years of marriage, Sofya – Tolstoy's devoted wife, lover, muse and secretary – suddenly finds her world turned upside down. In the name of his newly created religion, the novelist has renounced his noble title, his property and even his family (including their 13 children) in favour of poverty, vegetarianism and celibacy. Sofya also discovers that Tolstoy's trusted disciple, Chertkov (Paul Giamatti) may have convinced her husband to change his will, leaving the rights to his iconic novels to the Russian people rather than his own family. Consumed by righteous outrage, Sofya fights fiercely for what she believes is rightfully hers.

Into this minefield wanders Tolstoy's worshipful new assistant, the gullible Valentin (James McAvoy), who quickly becomes a pawn – first of the scheming Chertkov and then of the wounded, vengeful Sofya.

2009Rating: M, contains sex scenes112 minsGermany, Russia, UK
AdaptationDramaTrue Story & Biography
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Reviews & comments

Variety

Variety

press

Solid middlebrow biographical fare in which meaty roles are acted to the hilt by a cast more than ready for the feast.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

The kind of movie that gives literature a bad name. Not because it undermines the dignity of a great writer and his work, but because it is so self-consciously eager to flaunt its own gravity and good taste.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Tolstoy's autumn years are turned into sitcom farce, with unspectacular result.

2.0
0
Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

The film itself, energetically directed and written by Michael Hoffman, can't always rise to the level of its two dynamo stars.

0
Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

press

Some women are simply sexy forever. Helen Mirren is a woman like that. She's 64. As she enters her 70s, we'll begin to develop a fondness for sexy septuagenarians.

0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

Extravagant melodrama with brilliant performances...

4.0
0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

For those who enjoy actors who can play it up without ever overplaying their hands, The Last Station is the destination of choice.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Three superb performances by Helen Mirren, Christopher Plummer and James McAvoy should have Oscar handicappers drooling.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Handsome, engrossing, frequently very funny for a literary bio drama, and ultimately deeply moving, with pitch-perfect performances from one and all.

4.0
0

very enjoyable

4.0
0

Would have walked out but thought it might get better.. it didnt. Took a long time to see an old man die. Too much shouting and dramatic music. Plot and dialogue too modern. Dissappointing.

2.0
0

Well worth the going to, excellent acting and well portrayed.

4.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

Solid middlebrow biographical fare in which meaty roles are acted to the hilt by a cast more than ready for the feast.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

The kind of movie that gives literature a bad name. Not because it undermines the dignity of a great writer and his work, but because it is so self-consciously eager to flaunt its own gravity and good taste.

0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

Tolstoy's autumn years are turned into sitcom farce, with unspectacular result.

2.0
0
Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

The film itself, energetically directed and written by Michael Hoffman, can't always rise to the level of its two dynamo stars.

0
Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

press

Some women are simply sexy forever. Helen Mirren is a woman like that. She's 64. As she enters her 70s, we'll begin to develop a fondness for sexy septuagenarians.

0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

Extravagant melodrama with brilliant performances...

4.0
0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

For those who enjoy actors who can play it up without ever overplaying their hands, The Last Station is the destination of choice.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Three superb performances by Helen Mirren, Christopher Plummer and James McAvoy should have Oscar handicappers drooling.

0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Handsome, engrossing, frequently very funny for a literary bio drama, and ultimately deeply moving, with pitch-perfect performances from one and all.

4.0
0

very enjoyable

4.0
0

Would have walked out but thought it might get better.. it didnt. Took a long time to see an old man die. Too much shouting and dramatic music. Plot and dialogue too modern. Dissappointing.

2.0
0

Well worth the going to, excellent acting and well portrayed.

4.0
0