The End of the Line

The End of the Line

The End of the Line

A British documentary showing the effects of our global love affair with fish as food. It examines the imminent extinction of bluefin tuna, brought on by increasing western demand for sushi; the impact on marine life resulting in huge overpopulation of jellyfish; and the profound implications of a future world with no fish that would bring certain mass starvation.

200985 minsUK
Documentary
Director:
Rupert Murray ('Unknown White Male')
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Reviews & comments

Variety

Variety

press

In 82 minutes, Murray wrangles enough data to make his point that biology can't keep up with sophisticated fishing technologies and worldwide demand; attacks high-end restaurants such as Nobu for putting endangered species on the menu; praises Alaska as a paragon of responsible fishing.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Well-researched and generally evenhanded in its delivery of information (Ted Danson provides the narration), the movie more than makes its points without needing to resort to a montage of adorable fish being bashed on the head.

0
Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

press

Documents what threatens to become an irreversible decline in aquatic populations within 40 years.

3.0
0
Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

The world's marine life is under attack from the most efficient predator the oceans have ever known humans.

3.0
0

An important documentary, as the awareness about our oceans needs to be raised, and that's exactly what this film does. It also offers some partial solutions each one of us can take part in. We can and should all do our bit for our seas.

5.0
0
Variety

Variety

press

In 82 minutes, Murray wrangles enough data to make his point that biology can't keep up with sophisticated fishing technologies and worldwide demand; attacks high-end restaurants such as Nobu for putting endangered species on the menu; praises Alaska as a paragon of responsible fishing.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Well-researched and generally evenhanded in its delivery of information (Ted Danson provides the narration), the movie more than makes its points without needing to resort to a montage of adorable fish being bashed on the head.

0
Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

press

Documents what threatens to become an irreversible decline in aquatic populations within 40 years.

3.0
0
Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

The world's marine life is under attack from the most efficient predator the oceans have ever known humans.

3.0
0

An important documentary, as the awareness about our oceans needs to be raised, and that's exactly what this film does. It also offers some partial solutions each one of us can take part in. We can and should all do our bit for our seas.

5.0
0