DMZ: Limited Series

DMZ: Limited Series

Poster for DMZ: Limited Series

Rosario Dawson (Dopesick) leads this four-part adaptation of the DC comic as a mother journeying across a future war-torn American searching for her lost son. More

In the near future after a bitter civil war leaves Manhattan a demilitarized zone (DMZ), destroyed and isolated from the rest of the world, fierce medic Alma Ortega (Dawson) sets out on a harrowing journey to find the son she lost in the evacuation of New York City at the onset of the conflict. Standing in her way are gangs, militias, demagogues and warlords, including Parco Delgado (Benjamin Bratt, Law & Order), the popular — and deadly — leader of one of the most powerful gangs in the DMZ.

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2022USAARRAY Filmworks, Warner Bros. Television
AdventureDramaScience Fiction

Episodes

EPISODE 1.1

Good Luck

As the clock begins on Alma’s dangerous 24-hour passage into... More a lawless Manhattan in search of her son Christian, rivals Parco and Wilson seek approval from the DMZ’s major gangs in separate bids for governor.

EPISODE 1.2

Advent

As Parco and Wilson shore up last-minute support before their... More first debate at City Hall, Alma makes a desperate appeal to the holder of the DMZ’s ultimate power source.

EPISODE 1.3

The Good Name

Alma makes it clear whom she’s fighting for as Wilson’s... More thief is revealed, Odi’s kindness is returned, and Skel finds himself torn between Tenny and Parco. Then, war breaks out in the DMZ.

EPISODE 1.4

Home

Just as she negotiates safe passage out of the DMZ,... More Alma wrestles with a compelling reason to stay, while Skel is forced to choose between those he loves.

DMZ: Limited Series | Reviews

54%24 reviews

Rotten Tomatoes® Score

All reviews on Rotten Tomatoes
Slash Film

Slash Film

A well-crafted tale about hope in the face of hopelessness...

Full review
IGN

IGN

While this premise oozes potential, it’s stifled both by its incoherent politics and its plodding approach to its characters, which makes even its most powerful and charismatic performers feel without purpose.

Full review
IndieWire

IndieWire

DMZ is generic enough to accept multiple interpretations, which also means it can let specific messages get muddled by broad rhetoric.

Full review
San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle

It’s a political drama that’s studiedly nonpartisan. Whether that makes the show universal, or too cautious to risk possible future seasons, depends on which side you’re coming from.

Full review
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

It’s full of big ideas that never materialise and characters without room to grow.

Full review
Chicago Sun-Times

Chicago Sun-Times

It comes down to the usual post-apocalyptic tale about human beings who haven’t really learned anything after the world has been turned upside down... But boy, does everyone look good amidst all the graffiti and fallen skyscrapers and blood and bullets.

Full review
RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

That expert craftsman directors and some interesting actors can hold some of this thin plotting and clunky dialogue together at all is a testament to their skill.

Full review
Salon

Salon

The actors stretch mightily in their performances to sell the many plot holes that DMZ requires us to ignore...

Full review
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

The first episode... has some overwrought sequences, but Ernest R. Dickerson brings some welcome grit to the ensuing episodes.

Full review

DMZ: Limited Series | Release Details

DMZ: Limited Series is available to stream in New Zealand now on Neon.