Hannibal: Season 2

Hannibal: Season 2

Hannibal: Season 2

Showrunner Bryan Fuller (Pushing Daisies) puts a new spin on author Thomas Harris' creation by casting Cannes-winning actor Mads Mikkelsen in the role of Dr Hannibal Lecter. After the events of season one, the falsely accused Will Graham (Hugh Dancy) must find a way to prove his innocence while confined to a cell.

2014USA
DramaHorror
Creator:
Bryan Fuller ('Pushing Daisies', 'Star Trek: Discovery')
Cast:
Hugh DancyMads MikkelsenCaroline DhavernasLaurence Fishburne

Streaming (1 Provider)

EPISODE 2.1

Kaiseki

With Will Graham in prison, the FBI investigates his claims against Hannibal. A new serial killer emerges.

EPISODE 2.2

Sakizuke

As the FBI seeks Will's help in tracking a killer who turns his victims' bodies into art, Will plots to reveal the truth about Hannibal.

EPISODE 2.3

Hassun

As Will's murder trial begins, a copycat killer sends a gruesome message. Jack is under pressure to wrap up Will's case while Hannibal hopes for his friend's exoneration.

EPISODE 2.4

Takiawase

Emboldened after drug therapy from Dr. Chilton, Will sets a deadly plan in place to expose Hannibal. A new killer is turning victims into beehives.

EPISODE 2.5

Mukōzuke

The BSU investigates Beverly's death after her body is found displayed in a gruesome tableau. Abel Gideon returns to the Baltimore Hospital for the Criminally Insane. Will seeks a horrific revenge for Beverly's death.

EPISODE 2.6

Futamono

Jack suspects Hannibal might be the Chesapeake Ripper as two more victims turn up. Hannibal and Alana distance themselves from Will.

EPISODE 2.7

Yakimono

As Miriam Lass begins her recovery, Will is released from prison and resumes his pursuit of Hannibal.

EPISODE 2.8

Su-zakana

Will resumes his therapy with Dr. Lecter. The FBI investigates the murder of a woman whose body was found sewn inside a dead horse.

EPISODE 2.9

Shiizakana

Margot Verger seeks out Will as she tries to understand Hannibal. The FBI searches for an animalistic killer who tears his victims' bodies apart.

EPISODE 2.10

Naka-Choko

Will's readiness to go to dark places strengthens his bond with Hannibal.

EPISODE 2.11

Kō No Mono

Will and Margot hide her pregnancy from Mason. After Freddie's gruesome murder, Alana's doubts about Will and Hannibal grow stronger.

EPISODE 2.12

Tome-wan

Bedelia returns and accepts immunity to testify against Hannibal. Mason Verger plots revenge after learning of Hannibal's manipulations.

EPISODE 2.13

Mizumono

Springing their trap, Jack, Will and Alana face off with Hannibal in a bloody final showdown, but the doctor has a few surprises of his own.

Hannibal: Season 2 / Reviews

Variety

Variety

The show succeeds, to the extent it does, thanks to the braininess of its characters, Mikkelson’s positively reptilian approach to Lecter--taking a character with which the audience is so familiar and making it his own--and the clever use of a bracing season-opening sequence that frames essentially everything to come as an extended flashback.

Full review
Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine

For its authentic engagement with despair, Hannibal earns its wrenching nihilism: It's a great, epic vision of American horror.

Full review
RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

Hannibal is thematically brilliant and dense in ways that most network television is not, but it wouldn't remotely work without its committed, incredibly talented cast.

Full review
TV Guide

TV Guide

Its intensity, intelligence and dark power are the equal of anything on cable, with riveting performances led by Mikkelsen as the dapper, sinister fiend-in-plain-sight and Hugh Dancy as his tormented patsy, FBI profiler Will Graham.

Full review
A.V. Club

A.V. Club

If there are any notable steps up from season one, it’s both in the tension that mounts thanks to the great game played between Will and Hannibal and in the better use of the show’s supporting cast.

Full review
Vulture

Vulture

You could say it’s as close as a broadcast network has gotten to the personal artistry of the best premium-cable shows, if it weren’t bolder and more elegant than anything on pay cable right now, including HBO’s own serial-killer drama, True Detective.

Full review